Canada’s Best Places to Retire 2015

Based on cost, access to healthcare and more

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36 comments on “Canada’s Best Places to Retire 2015

  1. I would like to know where you can find a house in Kingston with taxes of $2,110. I am certain a lot of other people would like to know as well….this has to be a mistake.

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    • Money ‘sense’? What about the taxes they’re saying the average Victoria BC resident pays?
      The graph here: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/property-taxes.html indicates an average tax bill of $4,109.
      The data here says it’s a quarter of that!

      Maybe they were using the last ‘long census’ data?

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    • I know it is surprising but it is accurate. We have looked at Real Estate opportunities throughout Kingston and have found that most properties have low tax rates.

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      • Taxes are not low in Kingston. Kingston, like most Ontario cities, has had an exodus of manufacturing jobs. With no one else to tax, the Municipal Government relies on Property Tax for 60% of its income and an additional 16% from what is called other fees. That means 76% of the Municipal money comes from Kingston residents, mainly Homeowners. That is no way to run a city and is not sustainable. When a $900,000 dollar home in Toronto pays $1500 dollars less in annual property taxes than I do each year for my $300,000 home in Kingston, there is a problem.

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        • this is not try. a 900,000 house resale will have a property tax of about $6,000

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    • I would love to paying those kind of taxes. I live in Guelph, middle town home and I pay $4000 year. I need to consider moving.

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  2. You’ve obviously never heard of the Maritimes. Great housing prices, friendliest people anywhere, beautiful beaches, relaxed, easy-going lifestyle. Wake up, do your homework, Canada doesn’the end at the Quebec border!

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    • Thank you for your post.. I have never been to the east coast, but you make it sound so wonderful and inviting, that I plan to visit very soon. My husband retires next year so that may be our place of choice. Bev on June 2, 2015

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  3. Born and went to high school in Toronto, college in Kingston, 5 years working in Montreal and then 50 years in Ottawa where I worked and travelled from coast to coast before retiring for the past 20 years. Without question Ottawa is one of the finest cities in the world and when my wife and I have travelled I’ve proudly told people what a great citty Ottawa is and to be the capital of even a greater country.. I’m a proud Canadian!

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  4. So funny the pic of Burlington is the Village Square where 90% or so of the stores are empty.

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  5. I would like to see the full list of “The best places to retire”. Really lacks impact when only one is on the list.

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    • Use the ‘NEXT’ arrow!!!

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    • you are so right. I want to leave the US, as I fear what’s coming. Joliette sounds lovely, but who knows…..

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  6. Living in Toronto, loving the city. My entire family lives in Ottawa. I am trying hard to get a job there. The city is amazing, with Gatineau Park being 10 min away from downtown so my friends go for a swim there during lunch break in the summer. Where else in the world you have the untouched wilderness 5 minutes from the city centre? Ottawa is No 1, plain and simple!

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  7. I would like to nominate Sarnia Ont. as a great retirement city. Hundreds of Torontonians and northern Ontario residents are moving here each year for one of the mildest winters in Ontario, very reasonable housing costs, safe and friendly neighbourhoods, new waterfront condo and apartment developments great sandy beaches , swimming, boating, fishing on Lake Huron and the St. Clair river, numerous golf courses. New $10 million art gallery, RBC Centre ( OHL hockey), YMCA fitness and aquatics centre, 8 yr old $300 million hospital, 10 minute bridge crossing to USA and all their shopping and entertainment. All this and the best rated French fry trucks in the country under the beautiful Bluewater Bridges, come down buy a tray of fries and watch the thousands of pleasure boats, huge lake and ocean ships pass by only a few hundred feet away.

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  8. Your article is aimed at the middle class who have planned for retirement & can afford to own a house etc. What are the options for the lower class who have not planned as well and need government assistance. In Alberta, above the small amount of CPP & OAS that I get because I am a Canadian instead of an imigrant who is entilted to twice that, I get a Seniors Benifit plus free health care ( for whatever that is worth in this country) and free Blue Cross coverage. How does this compare to other provinces? I can barely afford to live here, and have been thinking of moving, but I do not know how to obtain the finacial info that I need to make a decision. An Article by you aimed at this problem would be enlightning. Thnx.

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  9. We moved to Burlington Ont from Thunder Bay 7 years ago and it was a shock to see how real estate was so expensive compared to the price we received for our former home. However, property taxes here were reasonable and there were so many amenities in this area.
    We love Burlington and plan to stay here. ..and the value of our home has increased about 30%, so we believe buying into Burlington was a good investment. The warmer weather and the access to the beautiful waterfront are bonus features.

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  10. If it had not been for the one western city, which is actually one of the most expensive places to live, I would believe your article is pretty biased! Well, okay I still do believe it is.

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  11. Interesting criteria. You seem to ignore the deep, heavy snow that is common in most of the recommended eastern cities. If you live in a condo that may not be a factor but if you have a home where you have to shovel it that could be a heart attack waiting to happen. Temperature is a non-issue for those who tend to spend most of the winter indoors anyway. There are so many other factors that can make a city attractive it is very difficult to indicate what city will appeal to any one person or couple. These shallow articles are always laughable.

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  12. Interesting analysis.

    Just to augment some of the responses re the Kingston, ON municipal taxes, the value incorporated in this analysis ($2,100) represents only 55% of the average 2015 levy ($3,700). The taxes in Kingston are extraordinarily high when compared to other cities of a similar size; municipal taxes per capita are high as are municipal taxes per $100,000 of assessment. Additionally, Kingston’s average household income is low when compared to other cities of a similar size. In turn, Kingston has a very low Affordability Index relative to comparable cities.

    There is no question that Kingston is a beautiful city to reside in, and to retire in. But be prepared to pay for its attributes via your municipal taxes.

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  13. How pathetic? 5 of the top ten in Ontario, 4 in Quebec. Nothing to the east of Quebec. Except for Victoria, nothing to the west of Ontario. I guess Toronto really is the center of the universe. How much am I paying for this subscription?

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    • Come retire in Quebec where you will be roundly looked down upon for the language you speak!

      No one goes to Quebec to retire. No one is that brain damaged.

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  14. You have got to be kidding me – Toronto has good weather but Victoria doesn’t?! I guess that’s why so many people retire from the BC coast to Ontario – oh wait, it’s the other way round. This is a perfect example of why you can’t apply quantitative measures to qualitative issues.

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  15. live in Oshawa north taxes over 6000.00 and others are far more.

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  16. Wow. The people that put “Canada’s best places to live must not get out much. We retired 2 years ago, and since I was born and raised in the east, and
    Some how, when we saw your list of where to retire in Canada, none of the mentioned spots came up as possible retirement areas, when we were set to retire a few years back. Since I was born and raised in the east, but took a job and
    raised my family out west, we looked at all of Canada, for the perfect retirement location. You folks didn’t hit any of the ones we looked at, as the best places to retire. We may have been way off base, but this was our list, starting in the east and working our way out west, using those who have lived in each one of these provinces, all of their lives, and our many trips back and forth across Canada, as resources. Looking at tax’s, cost of living, quality of life, health care, things to do, people in our own age group, biting insects, cold weather, hot humid weather, roadway access to and from, golf clubs/ swimming/boating/hiking/trail riding/hunting/fishing/ skiing, shopping/air travel into and out of the area, as our top criteria. In no particular order, Malone Bay, NS; Bra door Lake, NS; North end of Lake Champlain, Que.; East side of Georgian Bay, Ont; Thousand Lakes area,(south & east of Kenora) Ont.; Whiteshell area, (east of Winnipeg) Man.; {ignored Sask. & Alta. due to short summers & cold winters} Okanogan area, BC.; Southern Vancouver Island,BC, and finally, Trail/Castlegar, BC.
    Good luck picking from any one of these beautiful places, as it took us 2 years, to finally nail it down.
    Dan & Betty, Blind Bay, BC.

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  17. I too was disappointed in ten not being stated with more info.

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  18. This article is just a little skewed towards eastern Canada, so there is one place in Western Canada that’s considered worthy of retiring to? Give your head a shake!

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  19. Looking at the Moneysense and other lists for the best places to retire, it would appear that there are a lot of nice places to retire. From the Maritimes to Vancouver Island! It also appears from the comments that taxes really do not vary huge amounts across Canada. I guess that it costs the same amounts to plow the streets, provide fire services, police etc, etc. The owners of homes in smaller centres have the great benefit of a much lower cost of a home. My wife and looked at Niagara on the Lake – nice community, good house prices, good weather (for Ontario) but we need to look at other locations. There are so many choices!

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  20. really surprised and doubt accuracy of this report. taxes seem way to low. I pay about 380 $ a month in montreal for a small townhouse. so about 4,500 $ year which includes school tax. in my view Canada is not a great place to retire. is is simply too cold and many elderly people I know are afraid to go out in the winter for fear of slipping and falling on the ice. Vancouver island is about the only place that has any climate appeal in the winter thanks to mild temperatures. both Vancouver and Toronto are only for the very wealthy as housing is over the top expensive. I agree with the person who asks why are the maritimes not mentioned, but the winters are brutal there as well.
    Julie November 2015

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  21. I’m in the real estate business and I can tell you this tax information is absolutely wrong for all 10 locations and who in their right mind wants to live in Ottawa when they are 70 with 3 feet of snow icy streets and cold. It’s BC only

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  22. Prop tax of 1000? ??
    Hmm some of the priciest homes in Canada more like! !

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  23. Most people retire east of Quebec of west of Ontario. This is a bizarre list.

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  24. toronto no.2 ?? im telling you everyone i know here doesnt have toronto in their retirement plan and so am i.

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  25. Obviously whoever wrote this has no idea how wonderful BC is!!

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  26. Owen Sound in Ontario beats all of these places in my opinion. Huge medical community, beautiful parks, tons of waterfront, lots of retirement communities and tons of events and community groups. My parents live in the Seasons retirement there and I love visiting them out there and its only 2 hours from Toronto. Why worry about property taxes and a house?

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