9 personal finance books you need to read now

It doesn’t really matter what personal finance path you take, or book you read, as long as you’re moving forward

  3 Premium content image

by

From the January 2016 issue of the magazine.

  3 Premium content image

9 personal finance books you need to read nowYou don’t need to read dozens of personal finance books, if you want to get smarter about your money. In fact, that might even be bad for your financial health. “One of the things people get crushed by is complexity,” says Bruce Sellery, who just happens to have written one of our favourite money books of all time. As far as he’s concerned, it doesn’t matter which financial vision you live by—simply that you have one. “It doesn’t matter which direction you walk in, or if you take a detour along the way, just so long as you keep placing one foot in front of the other.” And if you like metaphors like those, you know which book to pick.

1. The Wealthy Barber Returns, by David Chilton

The 10-second take: The first time out, Chilton focused on saving more. Round two is about spending less.

Get it here.

2. Moolala, by Bruce Sellery

The 10-second take: Follow the “Moolala Method”: set your goals, develop a plan and stick with it.

Get it here.

3. Money Talks, by Gail Vaz Oxlade

The 10-second take: Ways to bring up money at the dinner table, for folks who were taught not to discuss money at the dinner table.

Get it here.

4. Wealthing Like Rabbits, by Robert Brown

The 10-second take: Saving is fun. And so is reading about it when you weave in zombies, sex and references to Westeros.

Get it here.

5. The Automatic Millionaire, by David Bach

The 10-second take: A five-step plan minus the other four steps: Pay yourself first.

Get it here.

6. Stop Over-Thinking Your Money, by Preet Banerjee

The 10-second take: Invest? Sure, but first disaster-proof your life, spend less, eliminate debt, learn to read fine print and delay consumption.

Get it here.

7. Millionaire Teacher, by Andrew Hallam

The 10-second take: Your personal savings rate—not your investment choices—will determine your wealth.

Get it here.

8. A Wealth of Common Sense, by Ben Carlson

The 10-second take: Skip short-term performance benchmarks. Take the long view on your investments.

Get it here.

9. The Opposite of Spoiled, by Ron Leiber

The 10-second take: What you should say when your kids ask, “Are we rich?” (Regardless of what you think the answer is.)

Get it here.


Join the MoneyFit club

Want even more tips to shape up your finances? Join the Money Fit Club to curb spending, boost your earnings, lower your taxes and more!

Learn to tone your money muscles all year long with our interactive calendar and sign up for our weekly newsletter for advice straight to your inbox.


3 comments on “9 personal finance books you need to read now

  1. Thank you for the list. I’ve already read four of these titles, and just placed requests for two more of them from our public library. I highly recommend the wealthy barber returns as the first must read

    Reply

  2. Agree with the list, but wish to also add: The Richest Man in Babylon by George S Clason is still a classic and got me started thinking about personal finance in the first place.

    Reply

  3. No mention of think and grow rich or the art of the deal

    Reply

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *