Video: The Great Pension Debate

The Great Pension Debate was hosted by The Walrus Foundation and HOOPP on May 30 in Toronto. With Newstalk 1010’s John Tory as moderator, pension experts argued for and against the resolution, “Be it resolved that Canadians are incapable of preparing for their retirement needs alone.”

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The Great Pension Debate was hosted by The Walrus Foundation and HOOPP on May 30 in Toronto.

Newstalk 1010’s John Tory moderated as pension experts argued for and against the resolution, “Be it resolved that Canadians are incapable of preparing for their retirement needs alone.”

Arguing in favor of this proposition is Jim Keohane, president and CEO of HOOPP, the Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan:

Arguing against is MoneySense Editor in Chief Jonathan Chevreau:

Rebuttal by consultant David Herle:

Rebuttal by Mercer actuary Malcolm Hamilton:

Open debate:

2 comments on “Video: The Great Pension Debate

  1. You can't have 2-3 cars, a 2,000-3,000 square foot house and may be a cottage or taking 1or more vacations a year putting it on a bunch of credit cards. People live in a fantasy world 12% to 30% credit card interest rates.Car leasing,gas, insurance, repairs etc. costing at least $700 per month per vehicle $4,000 a year in property taxes,$1800 per month mortgage payments or a condo with $400 per month condo fess, smoking and drinking costing at least $600 per month per person and just basic necessities food,clothing, telephone, heat, electricity etc. The bigger, more stuff you want means something has to give. Use common sense people and set your priorities. If you save $5,000 each in a TFSA for 30 years and earn a conservative 3.30% interest per year compounded each spouse will have $250,000 or $500,000 together total tax free. People you could start with half and gradually increase it.Start saving something now!

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  2. I think that both sides make very valid points in this debate. However, I believe that there are a slew of younger folks coming along that will not have defined benefit plans and, at the same time are incapable of saving to meet their needs. This group is not retired yet but when they do, the surveys will quickly tilt in that negative direction. This group I'm talking about will likely have lower incomes throughout their working careers as well as they will be shouldering increased health care costs and competing with other competitive international economies. OAS and CPP are really not enough if you head into retirement without assets and without other savings. Thank you for taking the time to hold this debate.

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