7 rug options for door mats

From pricey Persian rugs to durable woven vinyl, find the best rug for your home

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The seasons are changing and, as a result, it’s time to update the door mats that help to keep the dirt and debris down in high-traffic areas, such as hallways.

But door mats and rugs can be expensive and, if you’re like me, I want to make sure I get the most out of my textiles when it comes to durability. So, what’s the best sort of rug for everyday family wear and tear? Here’s an overview of the seven best door mat options when it comes to high-traffic areas.


Rugs (Getty : Datacraft Co Ltd)

Rugs (Getty : Datacraft Co Ltd)

1) Wool rugs

If your aim to incorporate natural, environmentally friendly fibres into your home, then look no further than wool. Both enduring and warm, wool rugs can be used in practically any room. Darker or patterned colours help hide dirt well and the rug itself often responds very favourably to cleaning—which is a plus in my toddler-traipsing household. Another plus is that wool is naturally flame-retardant and repels moisture—which is why we used it in our master suite, as the carpet abuts next to our family-sized ensuite bathroom. It means I don’t cringe every time one of my little guys runs from bath to bedroom with sopping wet feet.


Rugs (Getty / Nadeem Khawar)

Rugs (Getty / Nadeem Khawar)

2) Woven vinyl door mats

If durability is a must for your high-traffic rug than seriously consider woven vinyl. It’s not only easy-to-clean, but also mold and mildew resistant, and these rugs are far more durable than any other option on the market. Cheaper versions will definitely look plastic-y but more upscale stores also carry more upscale woven vinyl rugs which have an almost rope-like feel. The great thing, too, is that woven vinyl rugs can be earthy in tone and texture or bright and vibrant in colour and pattern. To clean you can just shake it out, or scrub it down with soap and water and hose it down with the garden hose for a thorough clean.


Rugs (Getty / YinYang)

Rugs (Getty / YinYang)

3) Cotton throws

Small cotton throw rugs are almost a staple in homes around the world. Most are soft to the touch and because they are small can be thrown into the washing machine repeatedly. While cotton is great at absorbing moisture, keep in mind it’s also great at soaking up the cold. If you need a warmer rug by your door for those cold nights, small cotton rugs may not be the best option.


Rugs (Getty / hudiemm)

Rugs (Getty / hudiemm)

4) Jute door mats

Another eco-friendly option, jute is a material constructed by natural fibers and woven (often by hand) with other plant-based material to achieve a multitude of textures. The great thing about jute rugs is that the neutral pallet goes with most decor and the natural hues hide a plethora of dirt and debris. Jute rugs, however, are not the cosiest option, but if you don’t plan on curling up on your entrance-way rug, jute can be an excellent option.


Rugs (Getty / Rappensuncle)

Rugs (Getty / Rappensuncle)

5) Sisal rugs

Consider this an upscale—and expensive—jute-texture-type option. It’s stiff, natural fibre means it’s a long-lasting rug option that’s static-free. But it’s got two drawbacks. First: It’s not great with water and wet conditions. And it’s expensive.


Rugs (Getty / Gregor Hohenberg)

Rugs (Getty / Gregor Hohenberg)

6) Persian rugs

Ok. Not the most cost-effective option, but if you can afford an authentic Persian rug you won’t find a more durable and sustainable option for your home. Around for hundreds of years—with price tags that reflect this longevity—Persian rugs add a luxurious feeling to any room or hallway. Select darker shades or more complex patterns to hide your family’s dirt. If you have animals, select a rug with high knot density (that can better withstand animal claws). That said, you’ll pay more for higher knot density.


Rugs (Getty / Petek ARICI)

Rugs (Getty / Petek ARICI)

7) Turkish kilims

While not as expensive as Persian rugs, Turkish kilims are comprable in terms of adding that exotic feel, but with the added touch of durable luxury.


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One comment on “7 rug options for door mats

  1. You’re seriously suggesting people use Persian rugs and Turkish Kilims as DOOR mats? As in, the mats at the door where people wipe or take off and leave their wet shoes?

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