Canada’s Best Places to Live 2010

Which cities have the best weather? The most affordable houses? The lowest crime rates? We crunch the numbers for more places than ever, to map out the winners you’ll want to call home.

by Dan Bortolotti and Phil Froats
April 29th, 2010

Online only.

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(For the full list and rankings, click here.)

If you want the scoop on which Canadian cities are the best places to live, Chris St. Clair is your go-to guy. After all, he crisscrosses the entire country every weekend. Well, not literally. St. Clair is a presenter on The Weather Network, where he gives country-wide forecasts to a national audience on Saturdays and Sundays.

During his long career as a broadcaster (and his former life as a commercial pilot), St. Clair has lived, worked or hung out in all of our major cities, so he knows what makes a great place to put down roots. He knows both the good and the bad in Halifax, for instance, since his family moved there when he was eight. “The summers are awesome, and the fall can be beautiful, but winter can be long and miserable,” he says.

St. Clair attended Acadia University in Wolfville, in Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley, where his father still lives. On his many trips back to the region, he’s noticed the types of changes that are happening in many communities across Canada. “Farmers are selling off their land and people are building large homes on large lots. Every time I go down, I’m stunned at how much development is taking place. It’s taking the rural charm out of it and making it a little more urban.”
His dad owned a construction company with an office in New Brunswick, so St. Clair has visited Fredericton and Moncton countless times. “Fredericton is a beautiful city. They’ve really done a nice job redeveloping their downtown.” He remembers being unimpressed with Moncton when he went there as child, but since then, thanks to one of the healthiest growth rates in the country, the city has come a long way.

While St. Clair has never lived in the West, he’s travelled throughout the Prairies, the Rocky Mountains and up and down the Pacific coast. One of his favourite cities is Victoria, but he wouldn’t live there—the houses are way too expensive. St. Clair and his wife Susan prefer small cities with lower living costs. Places like Kingston, Ont., where they settled almost 30 years ago. “I made a conscious choice not to live in Toronto. I couldn’t imagine living there and dealing with that traffic all the time.”

As St. Clair can attest, there are countless factors that contribute to a city’s livability. But in our annual survey, we go strictly by the numbers. There’s an old joke about a visitor to Lake Louise who quipped, “Sure, it’s beautiful. But if you take away the mountains, the lake, and the trees, what have you got?” In fact, that’s our starting point: we don’t give any marks for alpine scenery, sandy beaches, charming heritage buildings or other qualities that attract tourists. Instead, we focus on things we can quantify with hard data. We look at climate, because good weather really does make a city more livable. We concentrate on practical matters that are important for a person’s long-term happiness: affordable housing, prosperity, ease of travel, and good health care. We look for cities that show healthy growth, but aren’t sprawling out of control.

We refine our methodology each year, and we believe that this, MoneySense’s fifth annual ranking of Canada’s Best Places to Live, is better than ever. When we first started ranking communities, we covered fewer than a hundred—now we’re up to 179. We include every city or town of at least 10,000 people, but in the past, we lumped together communities under 100,000 in large metropolitan areas. This year, for the first time, we’ve separated out all suburbs of at least 50,000 people, which added a full 25 new cities to our survey.

As always, however, we don’t make it easy to score high marks. Although 105 points are up for grabs, only the top three places managed to score higher than 70. That’s because we rank each city from one to 179 in each category and assign full marks only to the winner. A city that ranks in the middle in a given category gets half the maximum, while the lowest-ranked gets only a tiny fraction of a point. In the end, the rankings look like the results of a bobsled race—some are separated by only a few tenths or even hundredths of a point.

The sunshine factor
As much as Canadians love to boast about our cold-hardiness, the fact is that most of us like mild temperatures and sun. That’s why weather is the most influential category in our rankings. We award a city up to six points in each of three areas: the amount of rain and snow, the number of wet days per year, and the number of days below freezing. Cities earn up to two additional points for air quality, as measured by the amount of ground-level ozone and particulate matter its residents are forced to breathe.

In the precipitation department, we look for the sweet spot of 700 mL of rain or snow annually. British Columbia communities lay at both extremes in this category: bone-dry communities in the interior such as Kelowna and Penticton scored low, as did soggy coastal cities such as Prince Rupert and Burnaby. Most of the cities that ranked high for fewest days with rain or snow were, not surprisingly, in Alberta and Saskatchewan. The Prairies are also home to many of our coldest cities. Thompson, Man., holds the title with a teeth-chattering 240 freezing days per year.

It turns out that the happy medium for Canadian weather is Southern Ontario. Of the top 20 point-getters when it comes to the three climate factors, 19 are in that region. Winters are cold, but most Ontarians don’t need to put a piece of cardboard in their car’s grille so the radiator won’t freeze; summers are hot, but not overly dry. “We actually get all four seasons here, and they’re all about as long as they’re supposed to be,” says Chris St. Clair.

Nice house if you can get it
Big cities like Vancouver, Edmonton and Toronto have many appealing traits, but affordable housing isn’t one of them. Although the real estate industry insists we’re not in a bubble, house prices continue to climb into nosebleed territory: the price tag on Vancouver’s average dwelling has risen to a staggering $762,100. (And if you just look at single, detached homes, some surveys say prices have hit $1 million.)

Of course, some people who live in Canada’s largest centres also have access to the highest-paying jobs. To reflect this, we also look at how long it would take a person to afford a home if they earned an average local salary. We award a total of 15 points in the housing category: 7.5 for average price, and 7.5 for the number of years it would take a local resident to buy a home.

The mix of stagnant salaries and rocketing house prices in 2009 had a big impact: Victoria’s affordable housing ranking slid from 147th to 174th, forcing it to give up last year’s top ranking and fall to number eight. Vancouver got hammered even worse. This year we separated out some of its surrounding suburbs and ranked them separately—and when we just looked at housing in the City of Vancouver, we found prices were soaring. Vancouver is now by far Canada’s least affordable city, with an average house price that’s almost 10 times what the typical household earns in a year. Vancouver also saw a big increase in unemployment this year, which helped sink the city from number five overall to number 29.

On the other hand, reasonably priced housing is a big reason why Moncton, Fredericton and Brandon, Man., have consistently finished high in our annual rankings. In New Brunswick’s capital, the average house price is just $125,000, less than twice the average annual salary.

Money matters
We’re not being judgmental, honest. We don’t mean to imply that people with higher incomes or nicer cars make better neighbours. But the fact is most people want to live in cities that are prosperous: affluent communities tend to be safer, cleaner and more pleasant than those that are weighed down by poverty and unemployment. To measure a city’s prosperity, we combine a number of factors and assign them a total of 25 points.

Few things can devastate a city faster than widespread joblessness: that’s why we give up to 10 points for high levels of employment. After several years of record-low unemployment in Canada, the national rate soared past 8% in 2009, and some cities were hit hard: several resource-based communities, many in Quebec and British Columbia, sit at the bottom of our list with unemployment rates between 13% and 22%. Montreal and Toronto, with unemployment rates well above the national average, also suffered.

At the other end of the spectrum, we found that cities that are stuffed full of bureaucrats, such as Ottawa and the provincial capitals, and those with a university or two, were pretty recession-proof. As other cities fell, they held their ground, so many ended up with higher rankings overall. When it came to job prospects, Ottawa jumped from 40th to 38th, for instance, and Fredericton leaped from 37th to 14th.

The recession has also hammered Ontario’s automotive industry, particularly Windsor and Oshawa, which scored low for their joblessness rates. Fittingly, though, both communities still have a lot of new cars on the road, so they did well in one of our other measures of prosperity. We awarded up to four points for a high percentage of new vehicles in a city, a sign that its people feel secure and confident about the future.

Income is also an important measure, of course. But earning a fat paycheque doesn’t make you prosperous if you’re forced to endure high costs for shelter, groceries and taxes. So while we measure the average salary in each city (four points), we also consider the percentage that qualifies as discretionary income (four points). This formula reveals one of the advantages of bordering major cities: residents of Markham, Whitby, Newmarket and several other communities score high because they enjoy the high salaries of Toronto’s job market without the sky-high housing costs of the city proper. We round things out by considering provincial income tax and sales tax rates (three points).

Life on the streets
There’s more to life than big bucks and fancy wheels, of course: the best places to live include a vibrant and growing population, access to good quality health care, safe streets and lots of places to have fun.
We start with population growth. When a city enjoys a steady flow of new people, that’s an indication of optimism and new opportunities. At the same time, many communities are growing so fast that their green space is disappearing, resources are strained, and they’re losing the charm that attracted people in the first place. So we look for a balance: highest marks went to cities that are growing at around 7.5% annually, two percentage points more than the national average. Cities growing much faster or slower ranked lower, while those with negative growth got a big fat zero.

Fighting commuter traffic day after day can be downright soul destroying. Not everyone can walk or bike to work, but a high percentage of people using two-legged or two-wheeled transportation indicates that a city is well planned, clean and safe. We admit to being surprised by the city that topped our list and took the full seven points in this category: Yellowknife. Okay, the thermometer dips below zero an average of 222 days a year and it only gets five hours of daylight in December. But the capital of the Northwest Territories is so compact and easy to get around that almost a quarter of its 19,000 residents walk or ride a bike to work. (Maybe it’s because their cars won’t start.)

We recognize that in many mid-size cities, residential and commercial areas are widely separated, but linked by excellent transit systems. This year we’ve tweaked our formula to reflect this: we now award five points (up from two) based on the number of residents who take buses or trains to work.

How easy is it to get health care in your hometown? We measure this by considering the number of doctors and other health professionals per capita. We add an extra point for a nearby hospital.

This year we’ve improved our measure of a city’s crime, which accounts for five points. We no longer look at the number of homicides per 100,000 people, which can be misleading. Rather, we use total crime rates, violent crime rates, and a new Statistics Canada scale that judges the severity of crime in a city.

Finally, we attempt to measure the cultural and recreational life of a city in an objective way. When we started our annual rankings five years ago, we awarded bonus points to capital cities, and those with pro sports teams and major attractions. But we listened to readers who took issue with our assumptions. Why, they asked, is it better to have an NHL hockey team than a vibrant music scene or fabulous skiing? So we’ve changed our methodology: we now measure the percentage of a city’s residents who hold jobs in the arts, culture, sports and recreation and assign up to five points to those with the largest proportion. Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto all ranked high in this category, but so did the mountain paradise of Canmore, Alta., and Stratford, Ont., home to a world-class Shakespeare festival.

Capital gains
When we tallied up all the points, our nation’s capital regained its title as the best place in Canada to live. Ottawa-Gatineau was our number one city in both 2007 and 2008 before Victoria knocked it from its perch last year. Kingston and Burlington each moved up a spot from last year and came in at number two and three, respectively. Fredericton leapfrogged Moncton to hold down the number-four spot for 2010, while Brandon slipped past Winnipeg into seventh spot.

By separating out suburbs with 50,000 to 100,000 people, we got some interesting results. Although Montreal ranked a dismal 120th, the newly included suburb of Repentigny debuted at number six. This community of 76,000, located north of Montreal, did well in many of our affluence categories, and also boasts affordable housing, low crime and a healthy growth rate. Meanwhile, Newmarket, Ont., a similarly sized city north of Toronto, debuted on our list at number 15, even as Hogtown, which no longer benefits from the higher living standards in its suburbs, fell from number 79 to number 85.

Chris St. Clair wasn’t surprised at the results: after all, he has a close relationship to each of our top three cities. He and Susan love the climate in Kingston, our number two city, where they’ve lived since 1981. The beautiful, breezy summers make their hometown one of the best freshwater sailing destinations in the world, and the moderating effect of Lake Ontario keeps winters mild. Home to Queen’s University, one of the most prestigious schools in Canada, the city is also a centre of culture and learning, not to mention pedestrian-friendly, with affordable homes and more doctors per capita than any other Canadian city.

Every Friday at midnight, St. Clair makes the two-and-a-half hour drive to The Weather Network’s office in Oakville, right next door to our third-ranked city, Burlington. It’s an extreme commute, but since he stays overnight between shifts, he only makes the drive once a week and avoids rush hour. Burlington’s high home prices are balanced by its residents’ high incomes, and although it got dinged for air quality (Petro-Canada runs a nearby oil refinery) it was rewarded for its glorious climate and almost non-existent crime.

Finally, every two weeks, the St. Clairs make the 90-minute drive to Ottawa, where Susan manages a building in our number-one ranked city. Ottawa-Gatineau may not be the sexiest place in Canada, but the national capital is an outstanding place to live. “I can easily see it being number one,” says St. Clair. “It’s our showpiece. It’s generally kept in really good shape, and there is tons to do. If you’re an outdoors person you can enjoy the river in the summer, and there is great skiing less than 30 minutes from your home.” It turns out that, as the crossroads of our two founding cultures, Ottawa-Gatineau really does have something for everyone.

290 comments on “Canada’s Best Places to Live 2010

  1. Let me get this straight…..you guys deduct points if a place isn't rainy enough? When it comes to dry, sunny weather, sunny days in warm months, mild winters, hot dry summers the Southern Interior of BC is so far ahead of the rest of Canada that your climates become the butt of local jokes. Prairie people come to the Interior and marvel at the lack of mosquitos and black flies (apparently they never knew there was such a place). Go to the Environment Canada "Weather Winners" site and you will figure out why people in Kamloops or Penticton are hitting the golf course in February while still enjoying the ski season. They are still golfing in November. Unlike Vancouver, nobody in the Southern Interior even owns an umbrella. Ottawa is a frozen wasteland in the winter and a humid oven in the Summer….wouldn't want to live there under any circumstances. Toronto is a flat, featureless and heavily polluted wasteland. There is no such thing as a smog advisory in Vernon. If you think Ottawa is the best place to live, you need to get out more.

    • Whoa there John, don't blow a gasket. Little bitter are we? How about a nice cruise on the Rideau Canal to calm your temper..

    • As much as I agree, John, that the Interior is the ultimate place to live – I mean I want to live there!

      The down side is that people have to be able to make a living there which is non-existent for jobs…unless you want to work at Tim Horton's or Sears for the rest of your life…nice try though…

    • Amen John!

    • Pretty much a generalization about mosquitoes and prairie people not believing they are everywhere, John. Yes they are a pain much of the time in Winnipeg but my cottage near Kenora, a two and a half hour drive away is so mosquito free we seldom use bug spray. As for your hot summers in southern BC, thanks but no thanks. When it gets hot in Wpg (admittedly usually more humid also) I long for the sunny winter days when my dogs and I can spend hours outside comfortably. Travelled coast to coast camping and seen some incredibly gorgeous places to live. This is home, however, and I'm always glad to get back.

    • I suggest you relax john and not to take any of this personally.
      Apparently you are quite stressed.
      Possibly the town in which you live is doing this to you?

    • I agree Kamloops and Penticton are blessed with great climate. But it doesn't mean the other locations in Canada are "Wastelands". But that's expect from someone from BC. Arrogance and always needing to bash other regions of Canada to make themselves feel better. *smiles*

    • Pretty much a generalization about mosquitoes and prairie people not believing they are everywhere, John. Yes they are a pain much of the time in Winnipeg but my cottage near Kenora, a two and a half hour drive away is so mosquito free we seldom use bug spray. As for your hot summers in southern BC, thanks but no thanks. When it gets hot in Wpg (admittedly usually more humid also) I long for the sunny winter days when my dogs and I can spend hours outside comfortably. Travelled coast to coast camping and seen some incredibly gorgeous places to live. This is home, however, and I'm always glad to get back.

    • you got it man .i work in alberta ,and live in salmo by kootenay lake .best of both worlds.and everyone who comes to my place to go fishing i have trouble getting them to go home lolol. its beautiful here.trees, sparkling water.i get to live where everyone wants to vacation.

    • hear, hear, I agreee with John. I've travelled across Canada and been in every province and I'd pick the interior of B.C. anyday. Jobs may not be easy to come by however there is no limit for private enterpreneurs. Since when do we have to depend on the government for jobs?

    • John was "Active" 5 hours ago but has probably turned over and gone back to dreaming

    • I agree with you John. I grew up in Ottawa and you couldn't pay me enough to live there again. Friggin cold winters, summers so humid and hot that as soon as you step out your front door you have to shower again. Ya good times. Not only that but the traffic sucks. I live in Vernon, BC now and I love it. Takes me two minutes to get to work, wonderfull beaches for cooling off in the DRY summer heat, great fishing close by, etc… We moved here from Victoria so we could actually afford to buy a place. It is so beautifull here that we don't go any where for vacation, we stay here! Cheers!-Jordan

    • DONT GIVE ME THAT GARBAGE, I SPENT MOST OF 2009 IN THE KELOWNA AREA, SUMMER IS SO SMOKEY YOU CANT BREATH, FALL IS CONTIOUS RAIN, WINTER HAS DEEP HEAVY SNOW. I TAKE SOUTH WESTERN SASKATCHEWAN WICH DOES HAVE BETTER WEATHER THAN MOST OTHER PARTS OF THE PRARIES AND DEFINITLY BETTER THAN B.C. ANY DAY

    • Gee, I live in Kelowna. Ever been here in the summer? Ever sat around in 40C weather watching ash fall from the sky? I viewed the survey to try and find somewhere to live that rains and is cheap. Somewhere that doesn't have water shortages, doesn't burn every year, and doesn't have a culture dictated by Albertan transients. Warm winters? Can you spell black ice; every day Into business? There's plenty of old people to rip off. There is a university here, has been for20 years, never had any real support from the community (they don't like humanists), which is why nobody seems to know about it. . I could go on, but climate aside, this place has a lot of really really unpleasant people, people that make John look fun.

    • Gee, I live in Kelowna. Ever been here in the summer? Ever sat around in 40C weather watching ash fall from the sky? I viewed the survey to try and find somewhere to live that rains and is cheap. Somewhere that doesn't have water shortages, doesn't burn every year, and doesn't have a culture dictated by Albertan transients. Warm winters? Can you spell black ice; every day Into business? There's plenty of old people to rip off. There is a university here, has been for20 years, never had any real support from the community (they don't like humanists), which is why nobody seems to know about it. . I could go on, but climate aside, this place has a lot of really really unpleasant people, people that make John look fun.

    • No smog advisory in Vernon? Were you around any part of the entire Okanagan or perhaps even the entire province last summer when the smoke from the forest fires kep me indoors for weeks?

    • Have you ever been out of BC. We are moving back to Ontario. Kamloops is a red neck barren smelly town
      and you golf there in the Winter because it is too hot in the suumer. . That is when you can really appreciate the Manure factory on the way into town. Vernon is okay however I would hardly call it a cultural mecca.

      Oh for the barren wasteland of Ontario I cannot wait!

    • yeah i guess as long as your house is fire proof Kamloops or Vernon is the way to go.

  2. When I retired from the Armed Forces in 1988, a survey had been done to find the best place to retire with a Military Pension. The best places were Wainwright and Medicine Hat, AB. I chose to retire in Medicine Hat area. The weather is mild and dry like Kamloops and Pentiton, BC, without the sales taxes and only 10% provincial tax. The Sun is always shining, People are walking all over, we have over a 100 kms of bicycle and walking trails, the deer are roaming in town, the longest commute time is 15 minutes. Here most people in the Art, Culture, Sport and Recreation are volunteers, the majority of the population is retired and they enjoy volunteering. We also can Ski and ride motorcycle in March and November. I walk for coffee with old retired soldiers every day, my wife walks for grocery and unlike BC we see the Sun rise 3 hours earlier and set 3 hours later. which gives us lot more vitamine D.

    • How could you possibly receive 6 more hours of sunlight when you're basically on the same latitude ? What did they teach you in the army anyways ?

      Krustinator

    • Right on Dan it seems like an awesome place to kick back and enjoy life, me I just joined the
      Armed Forces.

    • How could you possibly receive 6 more hours of sunlight when you're basically on the same latitude ? What did they teach you in the army anyways ?

      Krustinator

    • So let me get this right… Dan from Medicine Hat. On the summer solstice, the sun rises @ 1:30 in the morning and sets at 12:45 in the morning? Or at least that is how it would work if you get 3hrs more sun at each end of the day…
      So 45 min without sunlight, probably the same weather as the artic circle as well…
      Here in Kamloops it rises at 4:30am, and sets at 9:45pm on the summer solstice.
      Unlike Medicine Hat, it has never snowed here in June July or August…

    • Dan MH sounds great! What's the price of a 2 bedroom condo or twonhouse like? Medical care – lots of doctors?

    • Dan MH sounds great! What's the price of a 2 bedroom condo or twonhouse like? Medical care – lots of doctors?

  3. How about adding the tax free profit gained year to year on the home you live in. I am in Victoria with an average house and it is worth 100,000 more this year to my net worth. This is moneysense should be factored in as if i were still on the prairies i would be worth less.

    • Brian – regardless of your 'net' worth, changes are you are still living with marginal disposable income. What does it matter that your 2 bedroom 1150 square foot bungalow is now worth 750K when you paid 650K for it and still can't afford the payments?

      Come to Manitoba where the same home will be affordable at 250K, your next door neighbour isn't in your lap and you can always go to BC for the winter! Or better still, buy a nice condo in Florida for 175K, the weather is better in the winter than BC in the summer, the gas is cheaper and the produce is to die for.

      OK, OK, we have socialists in power….

  4. I completely disagree about how cheap Fredericton housing is. It may have been 10 years ago but now good luck finding anything decent for less than 200,000 andf it quickly goes up to there. Not to mention how high property and provincial taxes are. It's not a cheap place to live at all.

    • I am sorry, but in Vancouver you can't even buy a condo for that much (200,000).
      Our house was 375,000 in 2001 now it's over a million. I think maybe the Olympics had something to do with that?! I wonder if prices will start coming down now?

    • I am sorry, but in Vancouver you can't even buy a condo for that much (200,000).
      Our house was 375,000 in 2001 now it's over a million. I think maybe the Olympics had something to do with that?! I wonder if prices will start coming down now?

    • I think you should do some research on property taxes before you criticize the Fredericton rate: your comment is way off base.
      Butternut

    • Try Vancouver where 500,000 gets you a dumpy teardown with no yard. Our condo cost 400,000 for 800sqft. stop cryin about 200.000. I have that in my savings accou t for a down payment!!!

    • But in comparrison to other places Fredericton is a reasonable place to live. Check out the average prices of homes in other cities and you will find they are much higher than in Fredericton

    • hi Rhond
      I am planning to move to NewBrunwich. Can you tell me more about this province. Is it low cost of living as it said??
      Vinh

  5. $200K for a house in Fredericton is a steal compared to Vancouver's $750K. It's all relative, which is what this survey is about.

    • try $1,000,000 in Vancouver for the average detached home

    • umm, how many ppl you know in Vancouver that make between $20-$30 K a year in Vancouver Jake…I know plenty in NB where we pay one of the highest provincial income taxes in Canada so it's not all relative. We choose to live in the maritimes and accept low wages and high taxes but don't say it's relative because it's not. In other regions ppl have much more disposible income. You don't see mercedes, bmws, porsches in NB very often if ever and you do in the more affluent regions of Canada, that says something.

  6. So why not give us the complete list of 100 cities? I'm considering a move to London ON from Calgary and would like to know where it fits in…..

    • Calgary is a primitive City with a conservative mentality along with a fake smile in its people' faces.

    • Hi Marc: I've lived in Calgary since 1993. I own a 642 square ft. 1 bedroom condo downtown which I purchased for $250,000 in 2007. According to this year's Property Assessment Notice, the market value assessment of my home was $244,000.00 in 2009 with property taxes being $1,220.02 a year. The 2010 Market Value Assessment of my home is $170,500.00 with property taxes being $963.90 for this year.

      I didn't plan on staying in Calgary so long, it was my "in between" point, but I think the main reason I'm here is I like the big city feel, but I also love the greenery here as well. Nose Hill Park has got to be my favourite place to lose myself! The top of the park is the size of 424 football fields, and that's just the top. I'm not aware of any other canadian cities which have such a large park for dog walkers, runners, and cyclists alike. It's like being out in nature but you're still in the city.

    • My husband was transferred to London some years ago (1985) and when we retired we thought we would move back — we decided we would look at Ottawa, Kingston, Cobourg and various other places near relatives. After visiting and looking around these places – decided we lived in one of the best small cities with a great many amenities that we loved – so we stayed. Come for a visit – you'll love it !____

    • Calgary is a primitive City with a conservative mentality along with a fake smile in its people' faces.

    • why would you want to move to london?? work is scarce, rents and real estate are high and london is known to be one of the most corrupt cities in canada. the crime rate is high, there is more illegal fire arms in london than there is i toronto. I moved here from the west and it was a mistake. Youll also find the people rude and very unfriendly.

    • My husband was transferred to London some years ago (1985) and when we retired we thought we would move back — we decided we would look at Ottawa, Kingston, Cobourg and various other places near relatives. After visiting and looking around these places – decided we lived in one of the best small cities with a great many amenities that we loved – so we stayed. Come for a visit – you'll love it !____

    • My husband was transferred to London some years ago (1985) and when we retired we thought we would move back — we decided we would look at Ottawa, Kingston, Cobourg and various other places near relatives. After visiting and looking around these places – decided we lived in one of the best small cities with a great many amenities that we loved – so we stayed. Come for a visit – you'll love it !____

    • Stay in Calgary… London is quickly becomming the armpit of Canada

    • Come on down Marc, you will not be disappointed. It close to the big cities but is small town in many ways. What I like most is the pace and the fact that it contains a comp;et cross section of occupations and people.

    • yes – where' s the list? not sure it's reliable though – wouldn't want to live in Yellowknife! Brrrrr!

    • yes – where' s the list? not sure it's reliable though – wouldn't want to live in Yellowknife! Brrrrr!

    • It's an awesome city, I was born and raised there, I'm currently in Northern Ontario (Sudbury) and I really don't like it, there is nothing to do up here so i'm moving back in September.

      There is lots to do around town, lots of green space (hence the name forest city). the traffic can be a bit of a nightmare, but only during rush hour. There are tons of bike/walking paths that run into downtown following the river. There is good shopping, and a fairly low crime rate. It's nice to be able to travel to nearby cities like Toronto for a get away, it's only an hour and a half. There are festivals around town every weekend during the summer, and you are never bored. I find the downtown to be clean, compared to other cities. I would reccomend the West end for decent housing prices, or the North end if you're willing to spend the money.

    • I moved to this area and would suggest moving outside london as the city itself has poor planning and infustructure.Stratford is about half hour away from london peaceful and beautiful like Calgary.The weather though in south western ontario is amazing actual season.I still love alberta however the cost of living has gone up so much over the last ten years it has made it difficult to raise a family.Thats why we moved here and have no regrets at all good luck!
      Mike

    • Hey Marc, I live in London, ON and love living there. My oldest Daughter & her family moved from Toronto 5yrs ago and they love it as well. There is much to offer in London and a great place for children to grow up for the school systems are ranked very high in most areas.
      Hope you enjoy it as much as I do.
      Smiles,PJ

  7. Marc, the complete list is here on the website …

    I find it weird they still use the 1950s measure "car" as a current measure of a vibrant, prosperous, culture-filled city. I'd think there be points for getting them off the road, or places where they are less needed….

  8. Under lifestyle for Kelowna, it says that there is no university. I guess you did not know UBC has a Kelowna campus (http://web.ubc.ca/okanagan/welcome.html ) that confers graduate degrees, has an engineering faculty, and will soon be starting a medical school. Over two thirds of first year students are NOT from the Okanagan – many come from Ontario and the lower mainland. This institution is a separate entity from Okanagan College (that has first and second year academic courses plus trades) that has campuses up and down the valley. So you can see that Kelowna and the Okanagan have a high diversity of post secondary options to go along with a mild winter climate (avg daytime high of around +1 and low at -5 in January) and hot sunny summers that have low humidity.

    • To Many gangster and organized crime affiliates. But is a great place.

    • right on – it seems their research is either way out of date or wasn't actaully done

    • right on – it seems their research is either way out of date or wasn't actaully done

  9. Thanks Cam, I found the list and was glad to see London right up there (#12).

    • London is #12 as the best city in canada to live!!
      That is like saying Detroit is #12 in the USA

    • where did you find the list?

  10. Charlottetown, one of Canada's finest small cities, doesn't even get a mention? Housing is very reasonable, crime is practically non-existent, a long commute takes 10 minutes and a couple of traffic lights and the lifestyle can't be beat. Sure, we can get a lot of snow in the winter, but that's life in most of Canada. Fortunately, to compliment the snow, you get sailing and beach holidays for 4 months of the year a 15 minute drive from your front door.

    • I was hoping to find Charlottetown in the list but here it is in "comments" re No Mention!!
      – I agree with all of the above, plus many other attributes – walking trails, golf courses, scenery, lobster, theatre & very friendly people – come visit if you don't believe it!!! Lots to do for all ages – our university & College are as good as anywhere in the country!!

    • I was hoping to find Charlottetown in the list but here it is in "comments" re No Mention!!
      – I agree with all of the above, plus many other attributes – walking trails, golf courses, scenery, lobster, theatre & very friendly people – come visit if you don't believe it!!! Lots to do for all ages – our university & College are as good as anywhere in the country!!

    • I live in Charlottetown, and this city is a HAVEN for drugs, with people who are mentally unstable wandering the streets and screaming at random people.

      I came to this city, and I was appalled by how open people were about doing a very wide variety of drugs. Everywhere else, it's top secret almost. Something you only tell your close friends. Charlottetown is not a place to raise a family, nor live on your own. No opportunities, and no personal safety. I'm glad it didn't get mentioned.

    • I live in Charlottetown, and this city is a HAVEN for drugs, with people who are mentally unstable wandering the streets and screaming at random people.

      I came to this city, and I was appalled by how open people were about doing a very wide variety of drugs. Everywhere else, it's top secret almost. Something you only tell your close friends. Charlottetown is not a place to raise a family, nor live on your own. No opportunities, and no personal safety. I'm glad it didn't get mentioned.

    • I live in Charlottetown, and this city is a HAVEN for drugs, with people who are mentally unstable wandering the streets and screaming at random people.

      I came to this city, and I was appalled by how open people were about doing a very wide variety of drugs. Everywhere else, it's top secret almost. Something you only tell your close friends. Charlottetown is not a place to raise a family, nor live on your own. No opportunities, and no personal safety. I'm glad it didn't get mentioned.

  11. I wish they had a score for cities that promote health, fitness, and sports. I live in Calgary and it has a bike path system that goes on forever, the Olympic legacy of the skating oval, bobsled run, and Canmore to name a few that attracts world class athletes from just about everywhere.

    When there was this huge recession, Calgarians never seemed to miss a beat. The malls were busy, the roads were full of high end vehicles, the restaurants were full, and life just went on. If people truly want to work there is a job for them. Gas is 92 cents a liter when for some unknown reason, Vancouver is $1.17 on the same day. Go Figure. The Winter's have gotten warmer and shorter. You can fly direct to tropical locations. The Calgary Stampede is always a good time, the Stamps are great and the Flames suck.

    Well, nobody's perfect.

    We can ski, speed skate, try our hand at bobsled or skeleton, ski jump, cross country or downhill ski in the Rockies or swim at one of the few facilities in the world that has two Olympic size pools. We also send 250 people(on average)per year to the Ironman Canada Triathlon and host our own Ironman 70.3 event.

    Yes, it is getting big and the traffic is pretty intense, but it's just so easy to escape to God's Country when you are only a one hour drive from the Rocky Mountains.

    • 1 hour to the mountains, no way, one hour to the city limits… Calgary is a mess. The worst city planning possible. How can it be healthy when you need a car to go anywhere…

      • Calgary is not a small town, it is a big city. Try getting across Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver at rush hour they are all far worse.

    • you forgot …NO provin cial sales tax, No tax on used home purchase…NO welcome to the neighbourhood tax like many cities, not to mention the incredible amount of sunshine…..and the list goes on

  12. The people who did the story/survey about Canada's best place to live 2010 has no idea what they are talking about. Its says its based on towns and cities with a population of over 10,000 each, Yet some towns described in this article don't have 10,000 people. For example Bay Roberts, Newfoundland,( I haved lived in this area for the past 9 years) has 7000 people, Very low crime rate,Its usually warm and sunny during the summer time, Its below 0C about 30 days a year, not 156. There are 4 full time doctors here,not 0. and the list goes on, So for the future, the next time someone does information about Newfoundland, get your facts and figures right, or don't right anything about this great province. Thank You.

    • right on ralph newfoundland is always thought as a big joke as our people are often the brunt of many jokes,sometimes i wonder what if we didnt join canada?

    • Wow what a snit,you been talking to Danny Williams?

  13. I'm with you on Medicine Hat. Warm Summers (warmer than Vernon on weather winners). Winters are moderated by chinooks. The Sun shines here more than anywhere in Canada. Medicine Hat is where I'll rest my Hat.

    • I'm in agreement with Jim, Medicine Hat is a wonderful place to live, work and retire. I've been here 5 years moved from Ottawa. Summers there are humid, winters are icy and salty, here there is non of that. We get lots of sunshine here as opposed to the rain and damp of Ottawa. Ottawa as well has a poor transportation system and is spread out, a train system that is limited, doesn't even go to the Downtown core of the city where the government offices are located, dangerous for bikers, too many vehicles. Also I forgot to mention a Quebec/ French monopolized government and city where every job requires French and still less than 20% of residents are French speaking. I don't have to worry much about the language and getting a job here. Language requirements are based on the percentage of people needing to use that language. There appears to be some sense fo fairness about getting a job here as opposed to Ottawa.

  14. people people were all from canada no matter were we live its awesome, theres no need for this non-sense of oh were i live is better. everyone has their own opinion on it, we live in the greatest country in the world. i have been all over this fine country and its always been beautiful. so get over it and just all come to a conclusion that we all live in great places.

    • Ya, people, get over it !! None of this "my place is better than yours" 1st grade school attitude.
      If you want, give us good, hard realistic data….

    • The West could be great if we could eliminate the politicians working against the people.

    • Right on Chico, go boy, thats the spirit, we all need to focus on the great place we live in, Canada.

  15. chico I'm with you. I've lived in 3 provinces and work in most. I can't speak for the maritime provinces, but from Ontario to BC there are pros and cons to all places to live. And after 2 years we all have natural feelings to be loyal to our surroundings (usually). For the average person with an average job, I suggest that the Okanagan or the Kootenays are the best places to live in Canada if you are mostly considering the weather, crime trends, job market, cost of living and housing. That's my 2 cents, and actually I'm currently living in Calgary.

  16. I never comment on boards like this – but I hate how Toronto is always ranked and spoken of so poorly! I think that I live in a great city, with excellent access to world-class healthcare, parks / schools / public resources, entertainment, and jobs. I've always felt safe (crime "statistics" are always so skewed anyways), love the sense of community (depending, i guess, on what area of Toronto you live in), the multiculturalism and the moderate weather. I actually feel lucky almost every day to be living in such a vibrant, fun, and prosperous city.

    Anyways, I'm not trying to say that "we're better than you" or anything – I just wish people wouldn't be so quick to dismiss us as a barren wasteland full of busy/arrogant/uncaring people. As I'm sure EVERYBODY from across Canada is thinking (except for those jerks in Ottawa ON ;) ) : "come and get to know us before you judge us and tell everybody that our city isn't the best place to live"

    • Your multiculturism/bilingualism is what is destroying you.

    • you have never been mugged ak knifepoint in the city have you

  17. What a lame article. Too chatty, not enough hard data. Also article was highly east-centric…if you can't write a balanced article, don't bother!

    • Agree with you, Mohamad!

    • Mohamad, I just so agree with you; lame article all right. I expected a good, realistic, basic info on our cities; maybe on some sort of scale 1-10 or similar. Equal comparisons of all values, ie housing, taxes, crime, schools, health,entertainment etc. Maybe one day some clever, brainy well informed person will come up with a good evaluation.

    • There are some folks you can't please no matter how far you bend over backwards.

    • mohamad, go back to Asia , if you can only criticize Canadian ways

  18. hey i think you guys are wrong,newfoundland is the best..because if everybody was like a newfie the world would be alright,we maybe poor folks but we know's what living is all about

    • well i have to disagree on the " we might be all poor" newfoundland is definitely a growing province, we have the lowest crime rates, affordable housing in very prosperous neighbourhoods definitely the most preserved heritage, panoramic ocean and country side views we have a growing business community, so many of the worlds natural resources are in this province, health care is about the same as every where else in canda ( rated on population per capita)we have a world renound university, if you were bleeding in the streets, someone would be at your rescue immediately, if you were hungry they would offer you a bite, i can go on all night about the attributes of my province, this article was based on "best places to live in canada" but you stopped at nova scotia..i would like to think that you didn't do geography in school , and make an excuse for your uneducated article, where you left a province out, everything you based your answers on were personal preference and the fact that we couldn't compare to the mass population numbers you based this article on!!!__

    • well i have to disagree on the " we might be all poor" newfoundland is definitely a growing province, we have the lowest crime rates, affordable housing in very prosperous neighbourhoods definitely the most preserved heritage, panoramic ocean and country side views we have a growing business community, so many of the worlds natural resources are in this province, health care is about the same as every where else in canda ( rated on population per capita)we have a world renound university, if you were bleeding in the streets, someone would be at your rescue immediately, if you were hungry they would offer you a bite, i can go on all night about the attributes of my province, this article was based on "best places to live in canada" but you stopped at nova scotia..i would like to think that you didn't do geography in school , and make an excuse for your uneducated article, where you left a province out, everything you based your answers on were personal preference and the fact that we couldn't compare to the mass population numbers you based this article on!!!__

    • i agree with you 100% well spoken i think maby were all newfies at heart but just dont know it or afraid to show it lol

  19. Personaly, I'd choose Guelph over Burlington.

    • Medicine Hat = big oil boom no housing available for anybody there. Lots of young men living in trailers everywhere, Place is a dump.

      I`ll stay in beautiful Winnipeg

    • I agree. Burlington has major crime in comparison to any of the cities in the Tri-City area :S And it's cheaper.

    • I agree. Burlington has major crime in comparison to any of the cities in the Tri-City area :S And it's cheaper.

    • Burlington is a flat, boring, Big-Box wasteland. I would rather live in a cardboard box.

    • I stayed in Guelph for a month and a half last summer (lived in Toronto for 36 years, originally from Northern Ontario and have just moved back to be near family) and found it to be incredibly BEAUTIFUL and fun to walk around from where I stayed (20 min. walk or less to downtown)! I would live in Guelph ANYDAY. I've lived in Vancouver (too soggy, but of course lots of scenic beauty). Now I am exploring the incredible number of lakes and wilderness in Northern Ontario (near North Bay)… only downside is using a block heater for the car in winter, although … we didn't even have a winter in 2009-2010… virtually no snow… and mild as all get out. Good year for me to leave Toronto and move up North. I was really tired of Toronto… the heavy population, crime, and stifling summers.

  20. Wow – No Vancouver on the list? I guess our housing is a huge thing. I just bought my first house and it cost me $693K – I wish I could by a detached house for $200K – don't complain.

    • i bought a detached for 80.000 in parry sound 3 bdrm huge kitchen 25 x20 living rm only had to spend 20.000 on renos not bad got half a footballfield for a front yard and a nice forest in the back SCREW THE BIG CITYS GET OUT WELL YOU CAN LOL

  21. I live in beautiful West Vancouver BC. This beautiful seaside community is idyllic, even in the rain, where lush green fliage and masses of colourful flowers are with us ten months of the year. Golf, sail and ski all on the same day, cruise ships glide past as we walk or run on the seawall. The Lin's Gate Bridge keeps us just close enough to Vancouver and far enough away. There is no better place to live.

    • Well, good luck with your beautiful Raincouver. How can't you get depressed there?

  22. chico I'm with you. I've lived in 3 provinces and work in most. I can't speak for the maritime provinces, but from Ontario to BC there are pros and cons to all places to live. And after 2 years we all have natural feelings to be loyal to our surroundings (usually). For the average person with an average job, I suggest that the Okanagan or the Kootenays are the best places to live in Canada if you are mostly considering the weather, crime trends, job market, cost of living and housing. That's my 2 cents, and actually I'm currently living in Calgary.

  23. I would like to say tht Vancouver was elected number 3 last year. What happened in a year? I originally come from ONTARIO. It is very cold there in the winter, humid summers. I personally think Vancouver is more beautiful with mountains and pacific ocean there is no comparison. One can ski, swim and golf all in the same day.

    Laura

    • dont think i have th energey to do all of that and i'm in my prime. 22 years old.

    • You had the Olympics

    • dont think i have th energey to do all of that and i'm in my prime. 22 years old.

    • dont think i have th energey to do all of that and i'm in my prime. 22 years old.

  24. I never comment on boards like this – but I hate how Toronto is always ranked and spoken of so poorly! I think that I live in a great city, with excellent access to world-class healthcare, parks / schools / public resources, entertainment, and jobs. I've always felt safe (crime "statistics" are always so skewed anyways), love the sense of community (depending, i guess, on what area of Toronto you live in), the multiculturalism and the moderate weather. I actually feel lucky almost every day to be living in such a vibrant, fun, and prosperous city.

    Anyways, I'm not trying to say that "we're better than you" or anything – I just wish people wouldn't be so quick to dismiss us as a barren wasteland full of busy/arrogant/uncaring people. As I'm sure EVERYBODY from across Canada is thinking (except for those jerks in Ottawa ON ;) ) : "come and get to know us before you judge us and tell everybody that our city isn't the best place to live"

  25. St. Clair is an "Educated Idiot".

  26. hey i think you guys are wrong,newfoundland is the best..because if everybody was like a newfie the world would be alright,we maybe poor folks but we know's what living is all about

  27. I think Calgary it one of the best place to live in Canada,
    because: we have nice wather, Nice people, lot of job
    population over 1 millon. comper other big cities,
    close to Rockies (Mountain attraction).
    I was living in Montreal, for 10 years, 0ne years in Vancouver, and 10 years in Banff
    now I living in Calgary, and this is a heaven, lovely city, I love the C_Train, where ever you
    go in Calgary, it is beautifull. Calgary-beautifull restaurants, and good food.,
    If you want to have nice weekend go to banff or canmore, or any places in the Rockies, this is a privillege.
    to all calgarian to have the mountain biside us. There is lot to do in Calgary. I love you Calgary.!

    • Jesus, you have nice weather in Alberta? Compared to what? The North Pole?

    • Have been there many times, and it seems that everything you want to do,
      you have to drive about a hundred miles, no one answers phones, …was
      so glad to get out of there.

    • Nice Weather? Hilarious. This city has to have the worstweather on the planet. The wind blows constantly with Flurries flying well into May. You need to get to an airport.

  28. We are just evaluating where and WHY we live in Ontario. The fact is we are stumped. Talks have already begun about moving south: the point is sunshine, ocean, a slower pace, friendliness DO make a difference: to your health and peace of mind. In fact, why settle for just a week or two? If you can incorporate these elements into your daily routines than what is the point of living in an area where work, paying high taxes, and being ruled by your computer dictates the pace of your life. Can't wait for July 1st: we used to celebrate Canada's birthday and now it is the anniversary of harmonized sale tax: Ontarian s: why are we settling for the likes of this? I was away on vacation with my family, but I feel like I left home to come back here???

    • Just get rid of Daulton McGuinty and the horrible Fiberal party, and Ontario would be perfect

  29. Ok, so i just moved to Fredericton and i would like to know where you can find a suitable house for 125,000$. If you can find one you are looking at something that needs lot's of TLC. Our house is just an average size house and it cost 225,000$. There was nothing worth looking at under 200,000$. The average house is more around the 230,000$ mark. I don't know who you had in charge of checking out prices, but if you go to the MLS website you will see that 125,000$ does not have much, but if you go over 200,000$ that's where all of the suitable houses are.

  30. I grew up in Oshawa Ontario. I went to Nursing School in Toronto, Ontario. I loved Nursing and did well working as a nurse in that city for a number of years. I met a number of very interesting people and had alot good jobs. I even bought a condominium n the Beaches. An affluent area of the city. But I had money and employment problems there as well as relationship. the big city is really no place to raise a family. My brother did better with his life raising a family and stayinf close to my parents. I think my father suffered because of the money problems my sister and I experienced in the big city. Although I still love the big city for its diversity its culture and it vibrancy Oshawa is a more affordable and comfortable place to live a small town atmosphere in a city with alot to offer and close to home. I wish I could have owned my own home here, I also need to have a car and a family of my own. I lost my car and condo in toronto and am still hurting over these things. I also wanted to get a University degree. I am 56 years old and I am still without my own home.

    • I'm really sorry to hear of your troubles, Lynn. But you're right. The city is for certain people, and not
      for those who want to raise a family. Good luck to you from here on in!

    • I'm really sorry to hear of your troubles, Lynn. But you're right. The city is for certain people, and not
      for those who want to raise a family. Good luck to you from here on in!

    • all it takes ..is one lil bit of "nuclear" reaction…quite by accident…and your 300 thousand dollar house..just plummeted to zero in value…neva neva count your chickens..BEFORE they hatch..its a bd mistake many many have made…value what is in your heart…before material goods..they come and go like a bd windstorm…..or hurricane..

      volacones can erupt as well..and that lover;ly lil cottage you bought..is now under ash…???

      and you are breathing it in…what to do??

      maybe a lil less greed and a lil more pray ..for the people who really need…like are prisoners..for nothing done wrong..and are beaten and raped evry day..just cause the arsholes in charge..get a "charge" outa it…sicfcks…

  31. I find these studies rather interesting and comical. I agree that Williams Lake, BC is terrible place to live and work. Worse experience of my life living and dealing with those people. I have traveled through out B.C. extensively and have discovered that next to Williams Lake, BC is equally a terrible little town called, Burns Lake, BC.
    I can not think of anything nice to say about the crappy town of Burns Lake, BC. The people are rude, gossip and think they are above all others. What a laugh. The town is disgraceful and most people are to scared to even stop in at a convience store. Pass through this 'hole' and pay no attention to the people that reside in it. I will never go back there again!!!!!!!!!!!

  32. I live in beautiful West Vancouver BC. This beautiful seaside community is idyllic, even in the rain, where lush green fliage and masses of colourful flowers are with us ten months of the year. Golf, sail and ski all on the same day, cruise ships glide past as we walk or run on the seawall. The Lin's Gate Bridge keeps us just close enough to Vancouver and far enough away. There is no better place to live.

  33. I see St. John's Newfoundland …not mentined. Need I say more? I rest my case. "THE" #1 place to live

    • way to go me by you tell him

  34. I would rank Chris as the absolute best in his class (bar none) and would hear his comments with more respect than almost anyone else on the air; no exceptions.
    What a welcoming personality, a friendly face and a knowledgable advisor.
    Thanks to the weather network for such an outstanding on-air personality.

    • I really enjoy Chris on the weather network too. He is by far the best weather guy I watch, friendly, knowledgable, etc but this article, puh-lease. Where did he get his facts….from a 1975 published book or use a dartboard because you missed the mark on several cities.

  35. Ottawa is so unfriendly people walk across the street just to avoid eye contact. From December to March the place is covered with ice and when it does warm up the mosquito's have you for lunch every day until it gets cold again. Sunshine in Ottawa is by accident as the area can be covered in grey clouds for month's on end. If you think Ottawa/Gatineau is a desirable place you have never been anywhere else.

    • Ottawa, you must be kidding, with all those crooked polititions that live there. Best place what a joke.

  36. Loved the interactive map, wished the Top 100 were on it to show more of a grouping trend. I'm currently looking to relocate and that is something of interest for me.

    How about an interactive 'Best for You?' survey, where we could rate specific points that are important to us and get feedback that way?

    And the new car stats are misleading. Windsor has a lot of new cars on the road because we all know someone working in the auto industry -so we get their discount! Why would I buy a used car when I can get a new one for almost the same price?

    Where does this data come from? The unemployment rate in Windsor is almost double what shows on this report. I got layed off but I have a newer car, lol!!

  37. Fredericton? Are you kidding? It may have a university, but it's still a stupid little provincial town, with small minds to match. Plus muggy hot in the winter and numb freezing in the winter, due to its valley location. It hasn't changed much in the 40 years since I lived there, and that says something about its liveability.

  38. I think this was more of a personal opinion ranking than an actual data ranking. Sure there are some points that made sense, but if you're going to rank "THE" best place in Canada, at least be able to prove it without a doubt! And compare all cities, not just the ones you know!

  39. Chris St Clair an expert on the best places to live in Canada! Give me a break….. Just watch his performance on the National Weather Network. He knows every little settlement in the Maritimes, and Ontario and he elaborates on their weather, but what does he really know about the rest of Canada. He travelled through Western Canada, so does that make him an expert? If you want a realistic survey hire someone that isn't biased.

  40. Where's Niagara-On-The-Lake? Or Waterloo? Guelph?

  41. Where's Niagara-On-The-Lake? Or Waterloo? Guelph?

  42. Ottawa ?!!
    Unless you working directly/indirectly for the Government, you will starve in Ottawa.
    Save for the about 10 years, I have lived in Ottawa since 1980.
    I think the author is in a time-warp, 'remeber the days when NortelNetworks/Mitel/…. were silicon valley North and everyone had great jobs?. Hey St. Clair, those days are long gone. Ottawa is the "welfare" Capital of Canada these days. And even worse is Ottawa's real-estate is almost as high as Vancouver/Toronto.
    Like I said, the "overpaid/under-worked" gov't are the only ones who could afford these homes.
    And, for rich people who do not have to work, why would you live in Ottawa ?. Nope Ottawa "suks dead bears" as they say.
    I've lived and worked in Vancouver, and I've been to the southern interior of B.C. -thats why it's is beautiful.
    Ot how abought Lake Of the Woods in Northern Ontario, just north-east of Lake Superior. They don't cal it the land of 10,000 Lakes for nuthin' dude.
    But Ottawa ?
    eeeek

  43. I agree with earlier posts; It doesn't matter where you live in Canada its all pretty amazing. You just have to find what works best for you (longer winters, dry summers, major sports teams, small town feel, etc.) If I were moving from my home town of Newmarket (#15 – totally agree) I could just spin the wheel and be happy anywhere it landed (except Hamilton – just kidding). There's no wrong answer, just what's more right for you, and that is the great thing about our country.

  44. really, Windsor ont is ranked higher than vancouver… last time i checked vancouver was number 1 in the world…which itself is stupid. Who wouldn't choose Ny over vanhatten

  45. You people from BC need to get out more. Ive heard all about B.C. from numerous people from there and I finally went and lived in the lower mainland. It's not all that. Most people from B.C. that rave about it have never lived in Ontario and have a very limited point of view. Top 3 cities are in Ont. and 6 of the bottom 10 are in B.C. Moneysense got it right.

  46. where is the best place to live in Canada that has less snow and very mild?

    • Vancouver, absolutely!

  47. hey what about kitchener lol its small but nice and safe
    and Candida Newfoundland is beautifull but i could never live there no offence i cant stand the accent
    a newfie works with me and i cant understand a word he says

    • dont work with him meby

  48. I have lived in quite a few towns and cities and seen many different aspects of this so called city life and outdoor life. I have four girls and the place that I have found that seems to be one of the best places tolive and raise kids is Chetwynd, B.C., It has beutiful scenery great friendly people, oportunity to do anything, and just an all around great place to live. Small but great, so if you ever get the chance take a drive and ckeck it out.

  49. Ok, so i just moved to Fredericton and i would like to know where you can find a suitable house for 125,000$. If you can find one you are looking at something that needs lot's of TLC. Our house is just an average size house and it cost 225,000$. There was nothing worth looking at under 200,000$. The average house is more around the 230,000$ mark. I don't know who you had in charge of checking out prices, but if you go to the MLS website you will see that 125,000$ does not have much, but if you go over 200,000$ that's where all of the suitable houses are.

  50. whatever you do; don't move to North Bay, Ontario…..it sucks

  51. I've lived in many towns & citites throughout canada. I agree Medicine Hat is a good choice. Personally I've found Lethbridge, AB to be the top of my list. This is a small city, with good schools, affordable housing, beautiful parks, clean, and many walking/bike trails. The taxes are average, and the snow removal is somewhat of an issue. But we have gorgeous landscape surrounding the city and throughout. The crime rate is extremely low. Almost non existant murder rate, and not a significant amount of petty crime. Lots of volunteers for local events, a beautiful, family friendly city. Not disagreeing that some places may be better, we do have ALOT of wind, but Lethbridge is my fave ;-)

  52. Hello: my name is Dave and we live in a beautiful small town just east of Calgary & Edmonton beautiful weather lakes mountainview and we love it dearly I grow apples, apricots, grapes ,pears plumbs, asparagus, cherries many varietiesmake all my own wine. Also very low taxes paved streets low water and utilities nice folks here in town,.Just love it , was raised near Kingston Ontario, came to alberta 50 years ago and found this wonderful plac e to raise our childred and have retired here. thats all I can tell u because because we are selfish ands don't want everyone to move here[ha ha] remember this is Canada EH love it

  53. Ottawa…..good joke,its hard to get here some good job,because here is nothing,no factory,just gowerment,so if u work for gowerment u good.people is here they re boring like whole city is boring,nothing going on here,also live here a lot french,arabs and another weird people.Ottawa is no good at all!!

  54. 1.) Not sure what some of the people have read, but London and Guelph, On. were included.
    2.) Does the survey include surrounding areas because the population of Windsor, On has never been above 205,000?

    • Yes it does include census defined surrounding areas. Windsor's population includes the towns of Tecumseh, Lakeshore, LsSalle and Ameherstburg

  55. Loved the interactive map, wished the Top 100 were on it to show more of a grouping trend. I'm currently looking to relocate and that is something of interest for me.

    How about an interactive 'Best for You?' survey, where we could rate specific points that are important to us and get feedback that way?

    And the new car stats are misleading. Windsor has a lot of new cars on the road because we all know someone working in the auto industry -so we get their discount! Why would I buy a used car when I can get a new one for almost the same price?

    Where does this data come from? The unemployment rate in Windsor is almost double what shows on this report. I got layed off but I have a newer car, lol!!

    • Seems Windsorites have a good sense of humor. lol

  56. Fredericton? Are you kidding? It may have a university, but it's still a stupid little provincial town, with small minds to match. Plus muggy hot in the winter and numb freezing in the winter, due to its valley location. It hasn't changed much in the 40 years since I lived there, and that says something about its liveability.

  57. Fredericton? Are you kidding? It may have a university, but it's still a stupid little provincial town, with small minds to match. Plus muggy hot in the winter and numb freezing in the winter, due to its valley location. It hasn't changed much in the 40 years since I lived there, and that says something about its liveability.

  58. I think this was more of a personal opinion ranking than an actual data ranking. Sure there are some points that made sense, but if you're going to rank "THE" best place in Canada, at least be able to prove it without a doubt! And compare all cities, not just the ones you know!

  59. As far as i am concerened any where in Canada is the best place to live home is were you hang your hat whether its warm or cold , Canada is the best place to live on earth go Canada go !!!!!!!!!…………………:)

  60. Best place in Canada is Scottsdale, Arizona! <g>

    • lololol

  61. I guess I must be one of those "arrogant jerks" from Ottawa since I love this city! I've travelled all across our beautiful land and have always thought that Ottawa is one of the most lovely, diverse, fun places to be. That's not to say that I don't absolutely love many of those other places mentioned as well (like Montreal, Toronto, Vernon, Halifax, Kingston, etc…). I think we are very lucky as Canadians to have so many fantastic choices! It probably comes down to what matters the most to you in the criteria and the weight you place on those particular things that will determine your choice as "best". But just like the fellow from Toronto, I wish people wouldn't lump everyone in the same boat because of a bad experience.

  62. Chris St Clair an expert on the best places to live in Canada! Give me a break….. Just watch his performance on the National Weather Network. He knows every little settlement in the Maritimes, and Ontario and he elaborates on their weather, but what does he really know about the rest of Canada. He travelled through Western Canada, so does that make him an expert? If you want a realistic survey hire someone that isn't biased.

  63. These studies are always a joke. Most of us don't have many options when it comes to where we live in Canada because we need to go where the jobs are. Unlike, say, the United States, Canada doesn't have many options on where to live if you work in Finance or IT or a bunch of other professions that aren't service, health, or education-related. Toronto is pretty much the only place in Ontario I can live. I hate it, it is a totally miserable place to live, but it is my only choice.

  64. What a crock. The writer of this list obvioisly must of had to Victoria PMS when vsiting Victoria or the Okanagon.
    Get a grip!

  65. Nora says she can't stand a Newfie accent.She comes from a province thaqt puts a boot in about and a hard "k" in car.I'm not sure what an accent has to do with liveability but I do know that Fernie BC does it for me.I'm a transplanted easterner.Great winters,beautiful summers and excellent falls.

  66. My posts were removed. I posted polite comments but not praising Canada and they were removed.

  67. Ottawa ?!!
    Unless you working directly/indirectly for the Government, you will starve in Ottawa.
    Save for the about 10 years, I have lived in Ottawa since 1980.
    I think the author is in a time-warp, 'remeber the days when NortelNetworks/Mitel/…. were silicon valley North and everyone had great jobs?. Hey St. Clair, those days are long gone. Ottawa is the "welfare" Capital of Canada these days. And even worse is Ottawa's real-estate is almost as high as Vancouver/Toronto.
    Like I said, the "overpaid/under-worked" gov't are the only ones who could afford these homes.
    And, for rich people who do not have to work, why would you live in Ottawa ?. Nope Ottawa "suks dead bears" as they say.
    I've lived and worked in Vancouver, and I've been to the southern interior of B.C. -thats why it's is beautiful.
    Ot how abought Lake Of the Woods in Northern Ontario, just north-east of Lake Superior. They don't cal it the land of 10,000 Lakes for nuthin' dude.
    But Ottawa ?
    eeeek

    • Wrong!

      Of the three dozen people I know who live in and around Ottawa only ONE is a federal employee. Everyone else has regular jobs such as a teacher, commercial photographer, IT expert, translator, social worker, restaurant owner, software developer etc. And when I used to live there about a decade ago, it was pretty much the same. People LOVED to say that Ottawa is just about working for the governement.

      My time in Ottawa was awesome. I was a waiter in a posh restaurant… we saw the Simply Red, Celine Dion, Peter Jennings, Mordechai Richler as our customers. We saw tons of rich tourists come in… French people, Brits and Germans, all appearing to have a good time.

      I'd go out to bars and clubs with my coworkers after my night shifts… places were packed, streets were full.

      So you don't like Ottawa… just leave then.

  68. I agree with earlier posts; It doesn't matter where you live in Canada its all pretty amazing. You just have to find what works best for you (longer winters, dry summers, major sports teams, small town feel, etc.) If I were moving from my home town of Newmarket (#15 – totally agree) I could just spin the wheel and be happy anywhere it landed (except Hamilton – just kidding). There's no wrong answer, just what's more right for you, and that is the great thing about our country.

  69. I'm amazed that Nanaimo didn't even get a passing nod. Beautiful scenery (I don't care if it doesn't count), affordable housing, west coast lifestyle, mild, winters and sultry summers… I could go on and on about the perks of living here. I guess it will be our little secret.

    Anyway, no place is perfect, but there must be a reason why we're being flooded by retirees from the prairies. I heart Nanaimo :) !

  70. I'm amazed that Nanaimo didn't even get a passing nod. Beautiful scenery (I don't care if it doesn't count), affordable housing, west coast lifestyle, mild, winters and sultry summers… I could go on and on about the perks of living here. I guess it will be our little secret.

    Anyway, no place is perfect, but there must be a reason why we're being flooded by retirees from the prairies. I heart Nanaimo :) !

  71. So…

    Vancouver is rated #1 city to live in, in the world and its not even top 5 here? I really don't care about this list if it can't even get that right.

  72. really, Windsor ont is ranked higher than vancouver… last time i checked vancouver was number 1 in the world…which itself is stupid. Who wouldn't choose Ny over vanhatten

  73. Petrolia, Ontario is the best town on earth. End of discussion.

  74. best city to live in is miami florida or orlando florida canada is whack!!!!!!!!!!!

  75. You people from BC need to get out more. Ive heard all about B.C. from numerous people from there and I finally went and lived in the lower mainland. It's not all that. Most people from B.C. that rave about it have never lived in Ontario and have a very limited point of view. Top 3 cities are in Ont. and 6 of the bottom 10 are in B.C. Moneysense got it right.

    • I am from Ontario, Goderich and Stratford, and spent a short stint in Toronto as well. I wouldn't go back under any circumstance…my family is there and I have told them they either come here or we meet some where else like Mexico. I won't throw away the cash on a ticket to nowhere. I have been all over the world and there are many fine places I would be happy to live, Ontario isn't one of them!

    • I am from Ontario, Goderich and Stratford, and spent a short stint in Toronto as well. I wouldn't go back under any circumstance…my family is there and I have told them they either come here or we meet some where else like Mexico. I won't throw away the cash on a ticket to nowhere. I have been all over the world and there are many fine places I would be happy to live, Ontario isn't one of them!

  76. WINNIPEG! bahaha definitely should not be in the top Ten. They have a terrible crime rate, summers are full of mosquitoes, crappiest winters.

  77. Halifax has awesome summers? I must have been away that week.

  78. whatever you do; don't move to North Bay, Ontario…..it sucks

  79. whatever you do; don't move to North Bay, Ontario…..it sucks

  80. I've lived in many towns & citites throughout canada. I agree Medicine Hat is a good choice. Personally I've found Lethbridge, AB to be the top of my list. This is a small city, with good schools, affordable housing, beautiful parks, clean, and many walking/bike trails. The taxes are average, and the snow removal is somewhat of an issue. But we have gorgeous landscape surrounding the city and throughout. The crime rate is extremely low. Almost non existant murder rate, and not a significant amount of petty crime. Lots of volunteers for local events, a beautiful, family friendly city. Not disagreeing that some places may be better, we do have ALOT of wind, but Lethbridge is my fave ;-)

  81. Typical…….Saskatchewan doesn't exist AGAIN……hidden secret, I went to University in Saskatoon, and lots of sunshine, great people, beautiful city. Prairie people must get sick and tired of always being excluded…

    • Hey Donna, am agreeing with you totally,and besides all that, where else can you start you're day with beautiful sunshine, green grass, birds singing, to pouring rain with hail and tornado force winds to end all this at the end of the same day with snow!!?? You know you are in Sask. when you get the priveledge of seeing all seasons in one day!! It really is amazing! Sask., is a wonderfull province to live in.. Great People and lots to do! And yet after all this, we really are a province that doesn't seem to exist, and if you don't believe me, just watch the weather channel! Tee Hee Have an awesome day everyone and come see our Province, Bring you're down filled parka, rain boots, umbrella, sunscreen and bug repellent and you Will be sure to have a great time. Been living here all my life, done lots of traveling, but there is just no place like home!!

    • Hey Donna, am agreeing with you totally,and besides all that, where else can you start you're day with beautiful sunshine, green grass, birds singing, to pouring rain with hail and tornado force winds to end all this at the end of the same day with snow!!?? You know you are in Sask. when you get the priveledge of seeing all seasons in one day!! It really is amazing! Sask., is a wonderfull province to live in.. Great People and lots to do! And yet after all this, we really are a province that doesn't seem to exist, and if you don't believe me, just watch the weather channel! Tee Hee Have an awesome day everyone and come see our Province, Bring you're down filled parka, rain boots, umbrella, sunscreen and bug repellent and you Will be sure to have a great time. Been living here all my life, done lots of traveling, but there is just no place like home!!

  82. I agree with former poster, John, that less rain and/or drier climates should receive higher scores. The study already takes into account cold weather but the downside of milder climates in Canada (East and West coasts) is the amount of rainfall. While it's nice to have the occasional walk in the rain, a common criticism coast to coast to coast from Canadians is that too much rain (e.g. all of Pacific Coast, most of NL, good portion of Maritimes) or too much humidity (e.g. part of Maritimes, Québec and Ontario, where I live) is a downer. More rain = less sun, which is depressing. Why else would Vancouver, a city with a mild climate, have such a high rate of S.A.D.S.? I would for one would rather have slightly colder winters if it meant more sunshine and less wet conditions. Note this has nothing to do with the physical beauty of a city/town, as the study's authors admit. Perhaps next year's study could award higher points to drier climates (most of prairies, interior B.C., most of the North) when considering weather as a factor.

    • I would agree, I live in Halifax, it can be a nice place when the sun is out but most of the time you deal with plenty of cloud/fog/rain, and it is depressing. I use to live in Alberta, no question, the winters can be cold but at least you could enjoy the frequent sunshine. I've also noticed that when you get a sunny cloudless day in Halifax people are very upbeat, once the clouds roll in, many of them look like they've just come back from a funeral.

    • I would agree, I live in Halifax, it can be a nice place when the sun is out but most of the time you deal with plenty of cloud/fog/rain, and it is depressing. I use to live in Alberta, no question, the winters can be cold but at least you could enjoy the frequent sunshine. I've also noticed that when you get a sunny cloudless day in Halifax people are very upbeat, once the clouds roll in, many of them look like they've just come back from a funeral.

  83. Hello: my name is Dave and we live in a beautiful small town just east of Calgary & Edmonton beautiful weather lakes mountainview and we love it dearly I grow apples, apricots, grapes ,pears plumbs, asparagus, cherries many varietiesmake all my own wine. Also very low taxes paved streets low water and utilities nice folks here in town,.Just love it , was raised near Kingston Ontario, came to alberta 50 years ago and found this wonderful plac e to raise our childred and have retired here. thats all I can tell u because because we are selfish ands don't want everyone to move here[ha ha] remember this is Canada EH love it

  84. I've been an Ottawa resident for about 12 years now. I'm originally from Sudbury. Why am I here? Employment stability. Ottawa, being a "political" town in all aspects of the word, is close to being recession-proof. Taxes and housing? Not quite as described in the rankings. $300,000 is a minimum price for a lower quality semi-detached in an outside region of the Ottawa core. A single-family dwelling in Ottawa? Not affordable even with a household income of $120,000…unless you choose to live house-poor and give up your car as well.
    To purchase a decent townhouse in a clean neighbourhood, prices start at $280,000. We're talking row housing people! So the statistics/figures shown are WAY OFF the map. These numbers are skewed and distorted. If they can get info on the no.1 ranked city WRONG, it's obvious they've got the rankings very mixed up and wrong across the board.
    Ron

  85. (continued…)
    I suggest people do their own google search if they're considering a move to another city. Do your own homework, spend 2-3 days visiting and researching housing. In the end, if housing is not affordable, ya can't afford to move there!
    So…Ottawa? At least the air is clean, the water is relatively safe to drink, and the city is small enough to not worry about massive crime stats or serious, life-threatening gang activity. It ain't cheap to live here, it ain't as active a city as some might want, but if you're willing to pay the price of over-exxagerated housing costs, the rest is good.
    Ron

  86. Didn't see any comments re West Kootenay's BC. Good Best kept secret in Canada. Just enough Rain/Snow
    moderate winters, great summers cheap housing, cheap recreation.

  87. I guess I must be one of those "arrogant jerks" from Ottawa since I love this city! I've travelled all across our beautiful land and have always thought that Ottawa is one of the most lovely, diverse, fun places to be. That's not to say that I don't absolutely love many of those other places mentioned as well (like Montreal, Toronto, Vernon, Halifax, Kingston, etc…). I think we are very lucky as Canadians to have so many fantastic choices! It probably comes down to what matters the most to you in the criteria and the weight you place on those particular things that will determine your choice as "best". But just like the fellow from Toronto, I wish people wouldn't lump everyone in the same boat because of a bad experience.

  88. Top Cities in the World according to Mercer Consulting:

    3 – Vancouver
    15 – Toronto
    18- Ottawa
    22 – Montreal
    24- Calgary

  89. I look at life like going to a concert. You pay for the good seats. You can dish Vancouver – but when the sun is out – like it is today – there is no more beautiful city in the world. Forbes magazine compiled a list of the 10 most beautiful cities on the planet – the first was a small town outside of London England, the second was Paris and Vancouver ranked 3rd.

  90. I am currently living in Kenora Ontario and I believe that Kenora is a wonderful place to live. In this article Kenora is listed as the cultural waste land of Canada. Our city may not have a theatre but we have a Public Library, we have clubs, we have numerous Musical events that take place and we have many ethnic restaurants. This article has an untrue representation of Kenora Ontario, it seems that whoever decided this has not even been to here to experience the true culture.

  91. So…

    Vancouver is rated #1 city to live in, in the world and its not even top 5 here? I really don't care about this list if it can't even get that right.

  92. Hi folks, get your heads out of the hole and check out the Gulf Islands on the BC coast…When I first move here 35 years ago, I didn't need a second or third opinion on where I'll finish my days…Money is no object if your hearth is at the right place….

  93. Hi folks, get your heads out of the hole and check out the Gulf Islands on the BC coast…When I first move here 35 years ago, I didn't need a second or third opinion on where I'll finish my days…Money is no object if your hearth is at the right place….

  94. Well, Let me say they never even mentioned Newfoundland,I live in Edmonton,Alberta my house worth has got more raise then a Harley on the Hendy (Edmontian talk) I make Great money at a Bs Job my kids walk to school without fear of to many wierd Os. So life is good. But when I retire I would love nothing more than to park my Rv on the Ocean Side Of some Hick 2bit town On the Northern Pennisyla of Newfoundland watch the waves hit the cliffs Whale watch and fish trout from the stream…..Living on bakeapple berries and moose meat…So maybe the survey should be where in Canada would you not want to pay the Government to Rot away in Bills and poverity and Crime… Not wheres the best place to live in Canada because depending on what each individual praises as been there worth is to each there own….I love Bc Born In Sask Lived In NFLD until I was 20.Now reside in Alberta I LOVE all of Canada could be worse I could Live In IRAQ….

  95. I am just appalled how they rank cities like London and Frederickton the best places to live. They would be if there is affordable housing and jobs at the same time. I used to live in Regina and have some education. I left SK in 2005 because I had problems with a previous employer and went on a leave and could not find other work not even at a fast food restuarant . I heard now there is more work but then I heard my sister and brother- in- law's 1900 square foot house was appraised at $420K in Regina. If you want cheap housing move somewhere where there is no work and can buy a 3 bedroom bungalow for under $200K, thats the only route to go these days.

  96. Typical…….Saskatchewan doesn't exist AGAIN……hidden secret, I went to University in Saskatoon, and lots of sunshine, great people, beautiful city. Prairie people must get sick and tired of always being excluded…

  97. I agree with former poster, John, that less rain and/or drier climates should receive higher scores. The study already takes into account cold weather but the downside of milder climates in Canada (East and West coasts) is the amount of rainfall. While it's nice to have the occasional walk in the rain, a common criticism coast to coast to coast from Canadians is that too much rain (e.g. all of Pacific Coast, most of NL, good portion of Maritimes) or too much humidity (e.g. part of Maritimes, Québec and Ontario, where I live) is a downer. More rain = less sun, which is depressing. Why else would Vancouver, a city with a mild climate, have such a high rate of S.A.D.S.? I would for one would rather have slightly colder winters if it meant more sunshine and less wet conditions. Note this has nothing to do with the physical beauty of a city/town, as the study's authors admit. Perhaps next year's study could award higher points to drier climates (most of prairies, interior B.C., most of the North) when considering weather as a factor.

  98. I think the best place in Canada to live is wherever you find you feel at ease.
    For each of us what we desire is different than the next person.
    Where do I prefer? Well right now I live in Port Hope.
    Small community but close to the city of Toronto.
    Is there gossip? Oh yes, but that is beyond my control even if I won't partake in it.
    Is it the perfect place to live? No but its not the worst!
    Does it have some multicultural aspects to it in people? Yes!
    Is it perfect? No!
    Yet its got many close neighbors like Cobourg, Newcastle and Oshawa and life no matter where you live is what you make of it.
    Housing is priced nicely and again it depends on what you want or can afford.
    Oh, and did I mention its got live theater, beaches and it hosts movies at times from our USA neighbors due to being modern, but yet historical in different sections of the towns?
    Can be a bit stuffy & even unfriendly, but don't we all have days where we just don't want to talk to anyone? Can even be regarded as hick to elite depending on who you've met in town.
    Yet on the same vein the guy or girl in blue jeans chatting away to you could be stinking rich.
    Weather wise?
    Well its cold in the winter but not too cold, and yet through spring & summer nice as its right next to the lake! Many lakes actually surround her.
    Can it be boring? Yes, but then again I've been bored in Toronto too so it all depends on many factors in life. But it wouldn't be the best choice for singles as I personally noticed most are married or living together, or retired! Great place to raise your kids.
    Yet being single isn't the most horrible thing in a smaller town either.
    The city isn't that far away to find some fun.
    Only one thing that bothers me. Those darn vampires! Can't stand them anymore than the ones they filmed in Lost Boys. lol Yet if fog rolls in from the lake! Well you better bar your windows! lol

  99. Just for the record, John, I grew up in Saskatchewan and lived there for 25 years. Plenty of mosquitoes, yes, but NO black flies in the south of the province. I never saw a blackfly until I went to the interior of northern BC.

  100. A bunch of clowns from the "have not" province of Ontario picking 4 Ontario cities as Canada's best. How surprising. Like an earlier poster said, Vancouver is always voted as 1 of the top 3 cities in the world, sometimes winning that competition and these fools have them nowhere in sight. This is very thinly veiled jealousy.

  101. First off, average house pricing in Vancouver is 900K, not 760K (we all wish who live there). 2nd of all, stop bitching and complaining. This is the internet. It is obvious that the author of this article is a complete moron who believed the facts someone else wrote. So, you know what? Shut up. This country is amazing. Be glad no one is putting a gun to your head and forcing you to go to war.

    • for sure no war here,canada is one of the best places on earth and most places in canada are equal except for a few places in bc like williams lake other than that all of canada is equal. Therefore there should be no list chris st clair and all whiners.

  102. Ho hum. Having lived in Ottawa after growing up in Montreal, working in Toronto and visiting or working in most major urban centres in Canada including Halifax, Saint John, Charlottetown, Quebec City, Kingston, Hamilton, Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge, London, Winnipeg, Regina, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver and Victoria. Ottawa was extremely boring and I couldn't wait to leave. The only good things about it was Mtl was only 2 hours away and the commute times were relatively short when OC Transpo was not on strike.

  103. Miramichi City is not on the complete list of Canadian cities,it may be small with a population of 18,000 but is actually bigger than Summerside,PE (approx pop.14,500)
    Miramichi is a great place to raise a family with plenty to offer and should be on the list

  104. I agree with Charlie from Toronto. T.O. gets a bad rap from Canadian's across the nation. I live near Toronto, and must say I am very proud to have close access to such a vibrant city with More than enough to do, Swarming with amazing restaurants from round the world, An Entertainment Industry that can stand along with London's West End., a city that has some of the oldest buildings in Canada, a Harbor front bustling with activity in the summer, and the (former) world record holder of Tallest Building. There are some ares of the GTA to avoid, like any big city, it has it's good and bad. But I must say I feel Damn lucky we have Toronto as opposed to New York, or Los Angeles!

  105. Why do you think people would all want to live in a bigger city? There are many cities with smaller populations which are great to live in and raise a family. With modern communication and travel, we can access high quality medical care in the large cities when we need to. Do you consider the education system in a city? Do you think about the opportunities for activities of ALL kinds in a city (arts, athletics, community groups, healthy activities)? Where I live, we have lots of sunshine year round, the temperature is reasonable, and housing is not too expensive. Travelling round Canada, I've seen many lovely places to live but honestly love my home town the most.

  106. Read! the article. Scenery does NOT count.
    Ottawa wins hands down when you factor in the UNBIASED hard data points.
    Everyone's experience is unique which is why opinion doesnt count either.
    Ironically, Ottawa is also the only canadian city in the top 7 smartest in the world…its no wonder all the stupid comments are comin from elsewhere.
    By the way, this grade 12 educated, 50 K a year high tech worker enjoyed a lovely 20 degrees today here in the Nations Capital. Booya!

    • LOVE IT!!
      Please read post by 'Kandy', I think you'll enjoy that as well.

  107. Well i am not sure how you came to these conclusions but Dartmouth Nova Scotia In my opinion is one of the best cities in canada to live, i have lived in Calgary Alberta, Ottawa Ont, Guelph Ont, Peterboro Ont, and the dirty fithy city of Hamiliton Ont,( Surrey BC) , would be my second choice, but the twin cities of Halifax and Dartmouth are far the best place to live in Canada I go to bed and leave my doors unlocked can you do that? Not too many can answer yes to that statement, our economy sucks the big one but you would be hard pressed to get someone here to refuse to give you a meal or help you find your way i would be surprised if they did not offer to drive you where you needed to go!!! We all have suffered or continue to suffer hard times and turn no one away!!!

  108. Pingback: Onward and Upward as Thunder Bay Ranked 24th | netnewsledger.com

  109. Fredericton is nice but the price for a decent house is about $225,000+…maybe about 10yrs ago you could get a decent house for about $140,000…not now! The city police need to go out and catch vandals instead of blocking up the highways to pass out 'snow or slow' flyers and check inspection stickers…seriously, do you really need 8 or 9 police officers with 6 cruisers blocking the highway to check stickers?!?! What a waste of resources…go catch the people who spray paint on houses and cars instead of wasting people's time on the highway!

  110. sorry…that's 'snow means slow' flyers, lol

  111. sorry…that's 'snow means slow' flyers, lol

  112. One must take into account the demographics of each city.

    Not everyone wants to feel like they're living in Hong Kong or Mogadishu or Mumbai.
    It does not matter how much a home costs when you feel like a foreigner in your own country.

    For that reason, the best places to live in Canada are those places which still have a semblance of the European culture and people who founded this nation.

  113. I must say I am surprised at some of the places mentioned as best cities in which to live. After living in 5 provinces and 22 communities I have some preferences. Charlottetown would definitely meet your criteria. The south shore of Nova Scotia has some of the best climate in Canada and is FAR superior to southern Ontario where the summers are too hot and winters are miserable. Ottawa qualifies as a great city but for reasons other than yours. I live in NB now but will be moving again shortly and I will move to the Province that offers everything one could want for quality lifestyle, fishing, hunting, golfing, camping, arts, entertainment, reasonable costs (but too high PST) and the best friends and neighbours one could want or need; Newfoundland.

  114. Umm you forgot Sudbury the city in the north well I guess this mining city isnt big enough only 160,000 oh well maybe next year!!!!!

  115. Ho hum. Having lived in Ottawa after growing up in Montreal, working in Toronto and visiting or working in most major urban centres in Canada including Halifax, Saint John, Charlottetown, Quebec City, Kingston, Hamilton, Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge, London, Winnipeg, Regina, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver and Victoria. Ottawa was extremely boring and I couldn't wait to leave. The only good things about it was Mtl was only 2 hours away and the commute times were relatively short when OC Transpo was not on strike.

  116. IT'S TOO BAD YOU DIDN'T PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, WE HAVE ALL OF EVERYTHING YOU SAW, GREAT HEALTH CARE, LOW CRIME JOB EMPLOYMENT I COULD GO ON FOR EVER BUT BIG CITIES JUST DON;T IT

  117. THANK YOU HAMBONE!!
    Ottawa IS a wonderful, beautiful, opportunistic city to live and raise a family in…..
    I have literally lived from one end of this beautiful country (Victoria, B.C) to the other (Dartmouth, N.S) and plenty in between, and every time I've left, I've always come home to Ottawa.
    As Per;
    The East Coast (including Halifax, Dartmouth, Cole Harbour, Moncton, Shediac, Riverview, Petitcodiac, Fredericton, Charlottetown, but without Newfoundland as I have never had the pleasure of living there)-> I won't deny it's beautiful & full of culture, but the weather is horrendous & the job market just plain sucks; but I loved it anyhow.
    The West Coast (including Victoria, Vancouver, Nanaimo, Burnaby, Kamloops, Calgary, Winnepeg, Flinflon, Medicine Hat, Yellowknife, Kelowna, Edmonton, & Prince George [I've forgotten some, but I think my point is made])-> A good chunk of our beautiful countrys' most breathtaking scenery exists there, and it's an 'outdoorsy' types true playground but, B.C really does stand for 'Bring Cash' & the rest of out west is much of the same; but I loved it anyway.

  118. THANK YOU HAMBONE!!
    Ottawa IS a wonderful, beautiful, opportunistic city to live and raise a family in…..
    I have literally lived from one end of this beautiful country (Victoria, B.C) to the other (Dartmouth, N.S) and plenty in between, and every time I've left, I've always come home to Ottawa.
    As Per;
    The East Coast (including Halifax, Dartmouth, Cole Harbour, Moncton, Shediac, Riverview, Petitcodiac, Fredericton, Charlottetown, but without Newfoundland as I have never had the pleasure of living there)-> I won't deny it's beautiful & full of culture, but the weather is horrendous & the job market just plain sucks; but I loved it anyhow.
    The West Coast (including Victoria, Vancouver, Nanaimo, Burnaby, Kamloops, Calgary, Winnepeg, Flinflon, Medicine Hat, Yellowknife, Kelowna, Edmonton, & Prince George [I've forgotten some, but I think my point is made])-> A good chunk of our beautiful countrys' most breathtaking scenery exists there, and it's an 'outdoorsy' types true playground but, B.C really does stand for 'Bring Cash' & the rest of out west is much of the same; but I loved it anyway.

  119. Continued…

    North & Southern Ontario (including Quebec City, Montreal, Sudbury, North Bay, Repentigny, Trois Rivieres, Toronto, Burlington, Mississauga, Hamilton, Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Flamborough, Milton, Millgrove, etc.)-> There's nothing like the energy of a 'big' city, the anonymity can sometimes be attractive as well BUT, the crime & filth, mixed with the 'every (wo)man for himself attitude' just plain ruins it for me. I can handle it for a weekend, maybe.

  120. Continued…

    But, Ottawa???….
    Is a wonderful mix of the above mentioned & MORE. This is a truly multicultural city with no boudaries on possibility. It's clean and well kept, and the people here are all neighbours that truly care. So, for me, Ottawa is exactly where it belongs, in the #1 spot.
    One last rambling, if I may, in regards to previous postings on job availability here in Ottawa…
    From fast food & retail to a registered Aesthetician & an agent for Bell Canada (where I currently work) and many in between, I have never had an issue finding work & NONE of my jobs have been even remotely close to working with the government. So, please, your complaints of the author of this article being biased are quickly over-shadowed by your own hypocritical judgement & lack of experience. But, then again, I'm a little biased too I suppose….. ;-)

    Proud Ottawa Resident

  121. I agree with Charlie from Toronto. T.O. gets a bad rap from Canadian's across the nation. I live near Toronto, and must say I am very proud to have close access to such a vibrant city with More than enough to do, Swarming with amazing restaurants from round the world, An Entertainment Industry that can stand along with London's West End., a city that has some of the oldest buildings in Canada, a Harbor front bustling with activity in the summer, and the (former) world record holder of Tallest Building. There are some ares of the GTA to avoid, like any big city, it has it's good and bad. But I must say I feel Damn lucky we have Toronto as opposed to New York, or Los Angeles!

  122. Why do you think people would all want to live in a bigger city? There are many cities with smaller populations which are great to live in and raise a family. With modern communication and travel, we can access high quality medical care in the large cities when we need to. Do you consider the education system in a city? Do you think about the opportunities for activities of ALL kinds in a city (arts, athletics, community groups, healthy activities)? Where I live, we have lots of sunshine year round, the temperature is reasonable, and housing is not too expensive. Travelling round Canada, I've seen many lovely places to live but honestly love my home town the most.

  123. Why do you think people would all want to live in a bigger city? There are many cities with smaller populations which are great to live in and raise a family. With modern communication and travel, we can access high quality medical care in the large cities when we need to. Do you consider the education system in a city? Do you think about the opportunities for activities of ALL kinds in a city (arts, athletics, community groups, healthy activities)? Where I live, we have lots of sunshine year round, the temperature is reasonable, and housing is not too expensive. Travelling round Canada, I've seen many lovely places to live but honestly love my home town the most.

  124. It doesn't matter where you live in Canada It's all nice too bad we are being taxed to death.. They have no Idea how to run the country and the only answer is to raise taxes, give them self appointed raises on a yearly basis, unlimited expense accounts at our cost etc. etc..

    If we could get a decent, honest political system in where they weren't all crooked anyplace in Canada would be a great place to live.

  125. After having escaped Northern BC a year ago, I can say that all those places that rank at the bottom of the list do so for good reason. Aside from Hwy 16 being the Highway of Tears for the 200 or so unsolved murders of young girls over the last 30 years, I have never lived in a place that felt as dangerous or dejected as it did. Living between some of the "worsts" like Prince Rupert, Terrace, Williams Lake and Quesnell I now feel fortunate to not have been in one of those places. I recall staying overnight in Quesnell in Sept of 2009 at a motel and witnessing a full-on brawl that seemed to be girlfriend related in the parking lot right outside my room window that resulted in broken car windows, LOTS of broken beer bottles, blood and after a while, a couple of police who showed up after it was mostly done, mind you this motel was right next to the RCMP station.

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  127. Did you just throw names in a hat to see what order to place these cities and what cities to vote on? Burlington??? Come on! You obviously didn't include their police corruption or the fact that the people who live in this city have their noses so far up their butts they can see the roofs of their mouth. I know. I have tried living there and doing business there and have written this city off my list. Not only that but the weather in southern Ontario is horrible. It is hot and humid in the summer and very damp in winter – that's if you have the courage to go outside during their many smog days. I was hoping this list could give me some good ideas of where to move. (Can't stand southern Ontario anymore). Guess I was wrong. I've already written off most of your top 25 as some of the worst places to live!

  128. Did you just throw names in a hat to see what order to place these cities and what cities to vote on? Burlington??? Come on! You obviously didn't include their police corruption or the fact that the people who live in this city have their noses so far up their butts they can see the roofs of their mouth. I know. I have tried living there and doing business there and have written this city off my list. Not only that but the weather in southern Ontario is horrible. It is hot and humid in the summer and very damp in winter – that's if you have the courage to go outside during their many smog days. I was hoping this list could give me some good ideas of where to move. (Can't stand southern Ontario anymore). Guess I was wrong. I've already written off most of your top 25 as some of the worst places to live!

    • sounds like Burlington is being blamed for someone's business failure. City Police corruption-give me a break-it's a regional, not local force. Sounds like you're the one with the nose up the butt.

    • sounds like Burlington is being blamed for someone's business failure. City Police corruption-give me a break-it's a regional, not local force. Sounds like you're the one with the nose up the butt.

  129. Thank you Mr Chris St. Clair I enjoyed reading and learning all about our great country Canada and where it is best to live and I live in the third best city Burlington. I enjoy watching Mr. St Clair on the weather channel on the week ends especially when he tells us in Burlington we are going to have nice weather.
    Thank you for all the hard work researching all the information. I moved from Montreal many years ago and I am happy that I did. It was always so cold there.

  130. I'm afraid you forgot to mention the City of Kawartha Lakes where you pay taxes and see nothing for what you pay for except for Lindsay. Example: Not enough doctors, bad roads. Oh pardon me I thought you mentioned the worst city to live in

  131. What a wonderful country. We can grumble all we want and if we don't like a city we can move elsewhere ;which a lot of people in the world don't have the luxury of doing. My parents came here as a refugees 55 years ago and we've been grateful for a wonderful life in a great country. I do think its good to complain about things– it keeps the powers that be on their toes and gets things done.
    By the way, I live in winnipeg and love it. COOL EH ??!!

  132. where is the best city where 80% of females are beautiful?
    thats where I want be

    • Vancouver

  133. I guess we can conclude that every place has its advantages and drawbacks. I have visited most of Canada. My vedict: Halifax, Quebec City and Ottawa are the best places to live. But that is just my opinion.

    In this debate, lets say that we would ask the following question: if you could choose where you live, with the income you make, with your family situation and your interests and preferences, what would be the place? There are as many answers as there are places to live and, since most of us have not had a chance to experience life in all the communities, even that question has its limitations.

    I just hope that we all recognize that ANY place in Canada beats living elsewhere in the world. This country is fantastic because of its geographic diversity, but also because of Canadians. The best people on Earth, no matter where they chose to live in this wonderful land.

  134. Just like the Weather Channel, there is nothing correct about an article written about western Canada by someone from Quebec or Ontario. For them nothing exists west of the Lake "Superior" so why bother doing any factual comparison.

    I once went to England and was greeted with "How are things in the colonies?" The same attitude prevails in the east. They are the centre of their universe and don't forget it.

    Barry Pattman

  135. You people must be on crack. I lived in southern ontario for 20 years and I will never go back. Way too much snow and cold in the winter and humid hot weather in the summer, not to mention the mosquitoes. The reason Vancouver has high housing costs is because it is such an amazing place to live. If it wasn't so great the houses would be cheap. The climate is perfect, it doesn't have to be sunny to be warm. Vancouver is always ranked as the number 1 city in the world and yet you morons place Ottawa at the top.

  136. Poor methodology renders your conclusions useless. Whitby, for example is still a great place to live but it is growing too fast. You rate growth as a positive, rather than the negative it can sometimes be. You also like Whitby because it lacks the high cost of living in Toronto while maintaining the high salary base. What kind of life can these commuters expect in Whitby when they have to leave home by 6:30 am and not arrive home until 7pm.? Ride the GO Train a few times and hear mothers waking their school children with a morning phone call or in the evening instructing them to put the potatoes on to boil. Poor tired Dad hasnt arrived yet but perhaps he will have time to cut the grass while waiting for dinner. Some life!

  137. ya right you guys oughta try living in parry sound 900 a month for a 2 bdroom apt plus utilitys sewage also healthcare sucks takes me 2 months to get to see my doc jesus crap lol and im on wsib my reports are late because my doc is only in 2 times a week and this is really screwing things up for me BIGTIME

  138. The prairies have so many mosquitos you can't go outside after dusk.
    The climate is so dry, you have a constant nosebleed. How can cities in
    these provinces be even considered to be desirable?

  139. PARRY SOUND is nice clean great people i spent all my life in toronto met my fiancee quit my job of 15 yrs and moved here with only 2 weeks pay almost 3 yrs later i have a house ( that im only paying 500 a month AND THATS MY MORGAGE INC PROP TAXES ALSO a lil boy of 14months just the damm health care bugs me TORONTO WAS A GREAT CITY BUT NOT ANYMORE ITS SAD

  140. Most people are so naive that they think they are living in the best country, province, city, street, even the best house on that street! Where do you think the wealthiest, most successful Canadians live? If you were fortunate enough to earn $25 million dollars than where would you live? Anyway, lots of Canadians have it right. Anywhere in Canada in the Spring to Fall and anwhere south in the Winter.

    Personally, I like Vancouver over anywhere else but I hate the fact that so many idiots have driven up the house prices….Please do not buy a property in Vancouver until prices have dropped 40%. Thank-you.

  141. Let's not even get started about Alberta…yeah right!!!! doesn't even merit my time…way too much worth avoiding….including the ignorance…somewhat like America in many ways…yahoo the Stampede ….where's my drink partner……IDIOTS
    Canada mostly sucks due to pacifist mentality and spinelessness of Canadians..not the Canada I grew with…but hey that's just me.
    Go ahead…let's hear it weaklings

  142. CANADA'S # 1 worst place to live ……CANADA!!!!!!!

  143. Where is Cranbrook BC on the list?. Its not called sun city for no reason. BC has the best views, space, and weather. If your looking to go skidooing in July (or all year round) then hit the golf course BC takes the gold. As far as infastructure, road and a citys appeal……Cranbrook BC is dead last. I couldnt ride a pedal bike to work if my life depended on it due to lack of care and maintenace of the roads on the citys part. Canada as a whole is the best place to live on earth period. Just turn the news on to any city in the states and then rate our counrty on crime against theirs. We would be far ahead of many countries. Pollution is always bad in big cities,,….just be thankful you dont live in or around Korea, China or Japan. This article definatly needs a proper look over before its put on the web…there are alot of things which are extremely wrong with it.

  144. Don't send anymore people to BC, we don't have the room or patience.

  145. I agree that this is all relevent…no matter where you live, there are pros and cons….I live in Bathurst, NB, two of my children live in Vancouver, BC and when I travel there, I marvel at how much that city has to offer but am horrified at what anyone pays to live in a house like we have here. BUT there is no place to shop compared to Van. of course so no place offers everything. The way the weather is changing around , I think we have it good these days . The big point is we can go anywhere in 10 min. without having to deal with tons of traffic but then we don't have many places to go…HA! All relevent…..Just be happy no matter where you are….live well, love much. And if you get fed up, TRAVEL……Amen!

  146. home is were you make it al whitehorse yukon land of the midnight sun

  147. I can't understand why everyone thinks the grass is greener on the other side, it time to grow up.
    we are duped into think of greater places too live think again. Rents are too high and so our the gas prices,
    we are being told by real estates, because they want us all in debt/ Do not beleive everything you hear or see.
    It a great world if you try to live where your at. This is just my opion but I know it true. So you try thanks.

  148. the best place is montreal

  149. If you enjoy living where you are, then it is the best place to live, for you. Also, saying that Canada is the best place in the world to live, you may be right, if you enjoy living here. Having traveled the world, I can honestly say that there are many places that I would rather be than in Canada, but for now I'm here. Until you leave Canada, or your province, or your town, and experience different countries and cultures (and I don't mean experience them by sitting in a resort), you cannot say that a place is good or bad. The news is not a good source of information about what a place is like. If the place you live is the BEST, then why isn't everybody living there, or if a place is so BAD, why does anybody live there. Obviously, there is good, and bad, everywhere, so enjoy where you are, or move!

  150. I grew up in a hamlet between 2 cities. Both cities had such a rival mindset on many issues. After graduating high school I moved to a small farming community in Albert called Sunnyslope, the closest town was a minanite community ( Dry town, no booze) after 4 years in that area. I moved to Red Deer alberta. Worked and continued my education and training as a certified tradesman. After that I moved to Fort McMurray Alberta. I lived there for almost 5 years. Now I live in edmonton Alberta. Of all the places I have lived I enjoyed the country the most. Wide open spaces and friendly nieghbours. The country living isn't for everyone, but it is paradise on so many levels

  151. this article is a joke. the number one place to live in alberta is lethbridge?!? you have got to be kidding me. there is so much wind down there it is unbelievable. people have to lean forward when they walk so they don't get blown over

  152. I love how the West coat always hates on Ontario. Toronto is not a Flat wasteland and Ottawa is quite a lovely city….hence why it is our Nations capital.
    Jealousy will get you nowhere!

  153. OMG … Do you people get out much ? It's one thing to have an uneducated opinion in the confnes of wherever it is you confines are but really to post such drivel on a national newspaper is a bit over the top don't you think ? You opinions of Vancouver are weak at best so really you should actually travel here and spend some time before drawing conclusions . Winnipeg , Ottawa ? Puhleease …

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  155. This is so typical of eastern media. Choosing weather as the deciding factor essentially rules out Caanda's most vibrant, livable cities. I'm sorry but I don't think a city with a hour plus daily commute is quality. I mean you will always feel rushed because you are spending a month of your waking life per year just going from point A to point B. No thanks, prairie cities like Regina and saskatoon have all the culture of bigger cities with the amazing blessing and benefit of time. What's a month of life per year worth to you?

    Articles like this are the reason I would rather chew broken glass than read McLeans magazine. It is so slanted and biased as to be dispicable. I remember when they said Canada's worst neighbourhood was in Regina and the accompanying photo was of a downtown construction site! Tabloids have more integrity. Choosing the parameters is essentially fixing the outcome. And weather, vome on, arbitrary. Why not choose the best place to live based on how many people named "Bob" live in any given area?

  156. MONCTON HOW ABOUT 180 DAYS OF RAIN AND SNOW WHAT WHY DO YOU THINK WED ALL LEAVE FOR THE SOUTH IN NOVEMBER AND COME BACK UNTILL APRIL DOES THIS MAKE IT A GOOD PLACE TO LIVE ALSO POPULATION IS APPROX 60,000 THEY ALWAYS ADD IN DIEPPE AND AND RIVERVIEW THEY DO THAT WHEN IT SUITS THEM ALSO THE LANGUAGE BULLSHIT YOU DO NOT WHANT TO HERE ABOUT IT.

  157. When you start with a narrow focus and ignore the things that make a place really great such as people, transportation, ease of access to nature/wilderness, recreational activities such as fishing, hunting, camping, you know -living, you end up with a narrow list that may have some merit. But it's merit by accident rather than calculated. This list is not a true indicator of what is important at all and ignores many towns, villages and cities that far surpass many listed here. If malls are important this list may have merit but if other aspects of life are important, seek other places. I have lived in 5 Provinces, over 20 towns and cities and there sure are a lot of places that exceed this misbegotten list. I would include Ottawa, Kingston and possibly Fredericton in my list but most of the others, thumbs down.

  158. live in nfld meby

  159. Hi like know why you think Penticton is in the low score?The events we are from the Fest of Ale,Peach Festival,Ironman canada and many other events We do have a great hockey team called the Penticton Vees.Its the third time getting that name for our team.The first is the World Champions of 1953.But I for one love living in Penticton where I'm 3 gen.of family members who lives here in Penticton.

  160. This is the dummest list I have ever seen. Everyone [one hopes] knows that the order is: 1. Montreal 2. Toronto 3. Quebec.. 4…. well, if you have to live anywhere else, does it even matter what hick town or provincial nightmare you end up in? And a little note to the editors: pls try to compare apples with apples. Brandon and Quebec City are not in the same category. One is a city proper, the other an overgrown village. How about the best big city (eg: Ottawa), the best bedroom community (eg: Laval), the best little city that punches above its weight class (eg: Kingston)?? hmm?

  161. London Ontario (#12 on the list) is a clean and afluent city with great residential areas, big parks and forests (it's nicknamed "The Forest City"), lovely river, low crime, world-class hospitals, a short drive to two Great Lakes, a huge university (ranked #1 in a Globe and Mail survey for student satisfaction), and a vibrant and growing arts cummunity. It placed second in a University of California study on the best cities in North America in which to retire (after Victoria, B.C.) Four of our Gold Medal Olympians were from London Ontario, but Londoners are a pretty modest bunch. You don't hear most of them bragging about their lovely city or the exceptional people in it. I'm not a Londoner, although I currently reside here. I liked living in Vancouver. It's a beautiful city with fabulous scenery. I didn't like the rampant chauvinism, especially when it came from people who'd never lived anywhere outside B.C. St. John's is incredibly beautiful, friendly and interesting. Newfies are the least bigoted people in the entire country — nicest people on earth. I love you, newfies!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  162. Wait a second there are several problems with this survey. OK suppose in city A it rains 100 days of the year and in city B it rains for 50 and snows for 25. Well unless the snow melts every day you`re stuck with that precip for weeks at a time. At least if it rains today Vancouverites can golf tomorrow. If it snows todays you can`t golf for a month. Every survey I`ve ever seen says Vancouverites spend more time outdoors than any other Canadian city–that must be the true meaure of how hospitable a climate is. And it`s also part of the reason Vancouver`s real estate is the most valuable…it`s only overpriced to those who can`t afford it. Ferraris (like Vancouver) are expensive too but hey if I could afford it I`d buy one in a minute…same with Vancouver. If I could afford it…I`d live there again…honestly, who wouldn`t.

  163. Great story as it was the start of great comments !

  164. Get a clue; The reason a place has teh most expensive real estate is because it has the highest demand of people who want to move there – because they value it as the "better place to live". I have never met anyone that has lived in Vancouver and wanted to return to Ottawa – or anywhere else East of Alberta – never. The ridiculous and biased "opinion" based results are the whimsical fantasy of an Easterner who prefers 2 seasons to 4, mosquitoes and black flies to geese and whales and the smell of coal, dust and auto exhaust to fresh sea air. Because the Economist magazine continuously rates Vancouver in the top three molst livable cities in the world (usually in competition with Zurich and Sidney Australia) his read is nothing more than a comic strip disguised as news. Yeeks, "Ottawa?" I have know people who have cried at the prospect of having to move "back there" from the Left Coast.

  165. Vancouver. It has balance weather many entertainment and great place to relax

  166. Yes, I think you have forgotten about Kamloops (a growing city that is well planned and well cared for), I love it here and the people are very very friendly. Also Vernon, Kelowna and Penticton. It may be dry here in Kamloops in the summer but we always get a nice cool breeze at night and it is a dry heat.. The winters are short. Kamloops has 2 rivers intersecting in the city thus the dryness is not felt that bad. A great place to raise kids. This is my hometown, but have lived in Kelowna, Vancouver, Calgary, Sorrento, Logan Lake and the Yukon and traveled l/2 the world and always happy to come back to Kamloops.

    Gwen

  167. Whomever did these lists is either very poor at research or has a very strange ranking system. Just looking at Kelowna, BC alone I noticed a mistake and a strange ranking for culture. Kelowna DOES have a university and a college but it only lists the college. Studies have also found that Kelowna has the highest artists per capita in BC so I'm rather confused as to how low Kelowna ranked for Culture. And are you serious that Vernon, BC ranks higher than Kelowna? Have you been to Vernon?

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