The 2013 Charity 100

See which of Canada’s 100 biggest charities are best-in-class when it comes to spending donor money wisely.

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by MoneySense staff
June 19th, 2013

Online only.

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charities_2011_322 For the fourth straight year, MoneySense has graded Canada’s 100 biggest charities based on program spending efficiency, fundraising costs, governance and transparency as well as cash reserves. Only 48 charities have been awarded “A” grades, while 23 received “C” grades. The goal of our list is not to pass judgement on the merits of a cause—that’s your job as potential donor—but to highlight how charities spend their money. We also recognize that what may seem like extravagant spending on the surface, like in the case of many charity lotteries for instance, often nets millions of dollars in much-need funds that otherwise would not have been secured. See all the grades here.

 

Correction: MoneySense updated the Charity 100 data on July 9, 2013 to correct some errors caused by a spreadsheet malfunction. The original data had incorrect information for United Way Ottawa’s spending on programs. The correct percentage is 78.3%. This means the charity should have received a C+ grade in this category, and its overall grade moves up to an A-. MoneySense apologizes for the errors.

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13 comments on “The 2013 Charity 100

  1. the fact that Canadians have a generous heart is something that makes me truly proud to say I am Canadian but, if you are fortunate enough to be able to support a charity then please think about keeping our/your money working for our own Canadians. Almost every night on the news we hear of yet another program being cut for so called lack of funding but there are millions available to send overseas??? Please keep it at home for our own needy. Just my opinion…..

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  2. I clicked on Grades & also on Grades: The full list & both times it took me to a site with nothing but ads on it but no list or grades of any charities. Thanks for nothing.

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  3. I note that your list does not include the Salvation Army.
    Do you have any detail of how much of their program spending efficiency.?
    Thanks
    R. Campbell

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  4. I give to all charities that send me something in the mail. Could you just send me your listing without all of the other stuff and then I would just give to the ones that the most money goes towards to help the people. Thanks you

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    • Hi If you find the tab about one half the way down the page where it shows the corner of a list and tap onto that the list should come up.

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  5. I think you and other similar groups that do this kind of work in Canada should look at the work that the CEOs of GuideStar, Charity Navigator, and Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance are doing to debunk the myth that charities should not be spending money to do the work they do. The campaign they have unveiled is called "The Overhead Myth." Essentially the summary of their message is that "the percent of charity expenses that goes to administrative costs—commonly referred to as “overhead”—is a poor measure of a charity’s performance." You can see their work at their website with the same name (not sure if linking is allowed here, so I won't).

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  6. The Shriner*s Hospitals for Children is building in conjunction with Children*s Hospital in Montreal. Do they count?

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  7. The Sally Ann is the top number one when it comes any Charity giving and how it is spent, Period!

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  8. Why does the YMCA not appear anywhere on this list? If you include their child care locations, employment locations, language training locations, camps and their gyms , they have hundreds of locations just in the greater Toronto area alone.

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  9. Pingback: Turning the Tables: When Prospects Research Your Organization | #fundchat

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