New Couch Potato Column in MoneySense

If you’re a reader of MoneySense, you may have a noticed a new column in the May issue. I’m pleased to be contributing a new column to the magazine called Index Investor, where I’ll offer practical advice for fellow Couch Potatoes. My first colum…

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by Dan Bortolotti
May 6th, 2010

Online only.

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If you’re a reader of MoneySense, you may have a noticed a new column in the May issue. I’m pleased to be contributing a new column to the magazine called Index Investor, where I’ll offer practical advice for fellow Couch Potatoes. My first column (not available online, unfortunately) offers suggestions for investors who are just getting started. I explain that trading commissions make ETFs a poor choice for small portfolios, especially if you contribute a small amount each month rather than an annual lump sum. The issue is available on newsstands now.

If readers have any ideas for subjects they’d like me to address in future MoneySense columns, please let me know. I’m especially anxious to hear from mutual fund refugees who would be willing to share their (anonymous) stories.

As a complement to the new column, Canadian Couch Potato is now being mirrored on MoneySense.com. Visitors to the magazine’s site can view my blog feeds and add comments in the MoneySense template. Note that the Canadian Couch Potato site remains unchanged, so readers can view the posts in whichever format they prefer. The blog will also remain completely independent: I have full editorial freedom.

Finally, I’m proud to announce that my article How I Became a Couch Potato, which was published last year in MoneySense and ultimately led to the creation of this blog, has been nominated for a National Magazine Award. Let’s hope the judges aren’t mutual fund salespeople.

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3 comments on “New Couch Potato Column in MoneySense

  1. I would be interested to see an article that weighs the pro's and con's of using an etf verses an index mutual fund. In particular walking through a calculation to see the impact of the re-balancing cots associated with buying and selling an etf verses the slightly high expenses on a mutual fund. What would be really useful would be a chart/graph with time to retirement on the bottom and annual investment on the side and some lines showing where the costs are better to do one or the other.

    Reply

    • That's one of the main issues I discuss in my first column in the May issue. There's no chart (that would be extremely hard to do given the number of variables involved), but I give some guidelines about when it makes sense to move from index mutual funds to ETFs.

      Reply

  2. ok so i'm here because yoiur article in the May issue tells me i can come here and you will provide instructions on how to set up a Global Couch Potato portfolio with four ETF's..Where is it?

    Reply

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