Canada’s Best Places to Live 2012

Check out how your community stacks up.

by

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When we speak of Canada’s diversity we refer to the geography of the land and the ethnic background of our people. Yet when you crunch the economic data, as we have for Canada’s Best Places to Live 2012, it becomes clear that how we live defines us as much as where we live. Not only is our urban experience varied depending on whether we live in downtown Montreal or in small-town Saskatchewan, but our ability to access health care or find a job or afford a home is as diverse as our land and our climate.

What is more, the economic factors that determine how we live are always evolving. Thirty years ago, the place to be for jobs would have been southern Ontario. Today, as the manufacturing sector falters, we find good jobs are becoming scarce but social services left behind from good economic times are abundant. Similarly, Alberta and Saskatchewan are being transformed by the boom in oil, gas and other commodities. This puts a strain on urban communities as services try and stay ahead of the feverish growth of resource towns, and housing prices skyrocket—witness the average cost of a home in Fort McMurray (Wood Buffalo) is now a half a million dollars.

This year, for the third year in a row, Ottawa takes top honours with a score of 74 points out of a possible 105. Perhaps most notable however, are the number of Western cities that shot up this year’s list thanks to strong economic growth and low unemployment. Regina and Halifax catapulted up more than 15 spots each to rank 4th and 5th respectively. Similarly, Red Deer, jumped from 96th to 9th on our list.

Take a close look at the data and you’ll find the top-rated cities aren’t perfect or even close to it any category. They are however above average in most categories, resulting in an overall high standard of living.

This year’s list has been expanded from previous years to include 190 cities and towns with populations over 10,000. To compile our list we have taken municipal data and ranked the cities in 22 categories and then given all the cities an overall ranking. For a full explanation on how we crunched the numbers, check out our methodology.

Also new this year are three additional lists, Best Places to Retire, Best Places to Raise Kids and Best Places for Jobs.

We’ve highlighted what we think are the most interesting facts and figures to come out of this year’s data in a series of maps, articles, galleries and interactives for you but the possibilities for the curious mind are endless. Don’t let us stop you from diving right in.

Canada’s Ideal City

Top 25 Best Places to Live Map

Wondering what our ideal city would look like? Then take a gander at this interactive utopia, which lets you mouse over various structures and visual cues to see just what the most livable city in Canada might look like.

Galleries

Best Places to Live

Canada’s 35 Best Places to Live
We’ve crunched the numbers on 190 Canadian cities to find out which places are the most livable.

Worst Places to Live

Canada’s Worst Places to Live
Our rankings were not kind to every city. See which cities placed last in each of our major categories, as well as Canada’s worst overall city.

Top 25 Best Places for Jobs

Canada’s Best Places for Jobs
These 10 cities have the most prosperous economies and best job prospects in the country.

Best Places to Raise Kids

Best Places to Raise Kids
MoneySense ranks Canada’s biggest cities and towns in 10 categories to find out which are the most family-friendly.

Top 25 Best Places to Live Map

Top 25 Best Places to Live Map

Canada’s 25 top places to live 2012 include communities from coast to coast. Use the screen controls on the left side of the map to move around the country and zoom in on the featured cities. Click on each location to see that city’s rating in different categories and why it’s a great place to settle.

To see the complete list broken down by subcategory, download the full spreadsheet.

105 comments on “Canada’s Best Places to Live 2012

  1. Ottawa is Named the Best place ? You have to be Kidding !

    With the Restrictions they put on citizens, High Taxes, years of Transit
    problems that cost citizens Millions in wasted money, for Nothing, to Raw Sewage
    in drinking water, for years & years ….
    Some people at MoneySense better get their Noses Unblocked !

    Reply

    • hey come live in toronto and you will think ottawa is a paradise.

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    • look at the criteria

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  2. Having read the "Best" and "Worse" places to live in Canada it compares very favourably against the UK! Yes we have centuries of 'History' BUT sadly in the current social and economic climate around the world, this one time leader of acceptance, welcome and embracing most peoples to these shore are rapidly disappearing!! We have generations of family that have never worked (or to be truthful don't want to); a huge monetary influx of migrants from Europe when we can least afford them and if that isn't bad enough our present government has regressed to the Thatcher days and ethos: Look after the well off: Give tax relief to top earners and hit the lower paid who don't matter!! Bail out the Bankers who contributed in part to the crisis we are with MY money and then allow obscene bonuses for failure. And you wonder why we had riots yet again in this country!! I've been to Canada and just love the place and its folk. If I could I would move in a heartbeat:

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    • Tax relief for top earners? When can we expect ours then? All we have is a tax INCREASE due to my husband earning over £60k to support a family of 4!!! Child benefit taxhas taken thousands from us meaning I shall have to work to plug the gap. It might seem alot but by the time 40% tax, NI contributions and pension have been taken out I wouldnt want to admit to how little we are left with… all this for my husband busting a gut working long hours- away from home and family 2-3 nights every week and covering thousnads of miles every month on business!!! Why do you think we are looking to move away??

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  3. This "list" looks like a complete waste of time and resources. These rankings are hogwash and the best place to live also depends on your lifestyle and your background. An outdoorsman would probably consider anywhere to be a better place to live than Toronto while someone valuing arts or entertainment might prefer Toronto. I for one would put my city of North Bay ahead of Toronto any day. Other pieces such as your background or heritage might change your views.

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    • Come On. Crime rate stats are not hogwash, neither are job less rates, neither is cost of living or doctors per 1000. All of that affects your survival, not the love of art , landscape, or entertainment., You can't any of the things you love if you can't get a job, get mugged regularly, pass cocaine injectors on the sidewalk, or have $10 bucks left after paying rent (Life in Toronto). Come on people, it's not about what you love, its about Thriving first, so that you can enjoy what you love if you're not victimized and still have money left, and you're not idling in traffic somewhere.

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  4. i for one would rather live out in prince george then chatham kent ….. frak

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  5. I live in a van down by the river!

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  6. This is the only place where they consider 1 cm of rain as bad as 1 foot of snow. That's what they measure. Do Canadians really think that? while the weather statistics have improved, I still look at the bottom rated places and look for cities that still haven't recovered from flooding months ago. Cities that have to boil drinking water for weeks on end from flooding. Cities hit by a tornado. Cities with blocks and blocks of homes going days without power after big storms…..

    Ask anyone living in some of the bottom of the list weather wise, if they would like to move to someplace sitting in the dark, or piling sandbags to save their home from flooding.

    But to MoneySense only precipitation and number of cold days matters. It might be time to drop weather from the list if you aren't going to get serious in your investigation

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  7. This is what I think of the Okanagan,especially,Penticton:Big warm water,blue skies,things that money can't buy,we got it all here in the Okanagan and it's just for you!Peaches on the trees,grapes hangin' on the vine,we welcome you here to the Okanagan for the best of times.There's always something for you to do,waterslides,sailing and waterski-doo,hills and valley's,trails-what a view.So come one come all,the waters fine,we welcome you here to the Okanagan for the best of time(or wine)A little poem dedicated to the Okanagan:)

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  8. Winnipeg, Regina, and Edmonton are "better" than Victoria, Calgary or Saskatoon? Hahaha good one guys!

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    • Yeah, less whiners I guess.

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    • Money wise yes that's why lot of people from BC work in Alberta, which is true!

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    • I moved from Toronto to Regina for one thing only, quality of life (i.e. jobs). Regina salaries are very high, and you start with 4 weeks vacation, and get this, you actually get to leave work at 5pm to be with the unusual entities known as FAMILY. Crazy huh? So for me, yeah, Regina is "better" than Toronto, money-wise for sure.

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  9. Calgary beats Edmonton for culture?! Good one! If you consider capitalists, rodeos and freeways culture, then I guess it does.

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    • Exactly, there are a two major flaws with this scoring system

      WALK/BIKE TO WORK: 7 points – This represents the percentage of people who walked or took their bike to work. Source: 2006 Statistics Canada reports
      INCOME TAXES: 2 points – Cities ranked (lower is better) according to the rate of combined federal and provincial (or territorial) income tax paid on a single person income of $50,000. Source: http://www.taxtips.ca.

      They use 6 year old data to calculate how many people walk to work and it’s worth 7 points while what you pay in income tax is only worth 2 points. So they are saying you are happy to pay more taxes as long you walked to work 6 years ago………

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    • Good point. I would agree with Edmonton over Calgary, but how on earth did they get to the correct conclusion by overlooking Edmonton's biggest advantage?

      Last year the Calgary Fringe Festival broke two of their own records: 1, not going bankrupt and 2, over 5,000 tickets sold. Edmonton did 5,000 tix in its first year, 31 years ago, and last year broke 100,000 tix. I could go on…

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  10. Have to question the credibility of this list when for example Halifax goes from 21 to 4 in a twelve month period. As a resident, not much has changed in a year.

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    • Thanks for reading Kevin. We rely heavily on StatsCan census data which is only updated every 5 years. For this year's list we used 2011 population data for instance which resulted in some big moves on our list.

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  11. What about access to an international airport?

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  12. The xls is locked and thus much less useful.

    Things I wanted to do, but couldn't because the xls is locked:
    * Sort cities by a specific column
    * Highlight the row of a city that interests me
    * Lock the column headings in place such that they don't scroll when the data scrolls

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    • Try cut and paste?

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  13. Regina #5 – Vancouver #56…nough said!

    What a joke!

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    • calgary the way to go

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  14. This rating always makes people crazy….the magazine does what it can and uses a set criteria. Of course most people love the place they live right now and would not move. We choose where we live based on our lives, our jobs, our hobbies. This is very generallized and also very interesting…look at it for what it is.
    I like where I live…could be warmer right now but it will come in time. Number 44 is ok with me.

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    • As you say it the places at the opposite ends do have their certain faults in great degrees.
      Just being no. 44 close to center, but still being near the top should be considered good enough.
      If weather is the top over riding factor. So be it! (another Kamloops resident).

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  15. this is inaccurate. "best" is entirely subjective. and not including Toronto is petty, really. Its obviously one of the best cities in Canada to live in. it just shows that you're mad jealous. Burlington at #2? Guuuurl have you been there? its boring, ugly, and unsustainable. no one hardly even goes outside.

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    • Uh… meet me down along the lake at Spencer Smith Park. We'll walk to the new Theatre Arts Centre, then maybe stroll along Lakeshore and gaze at the $10 million homes. I mean, have you been here? In Burlington? Really?

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    • No on hardly goes outside? Dude, you clearly havent BEEN to Burlington before. Go walk down Lakeshore and downtown and look at the mansions and lets see how "ugly" Burlington is now.

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    • Toronto is seriously ugly with its streetcars, homeless everywhere, murders everyday, city strikes, jobless rate, 75% poverty amongst women and children due to cost of living, and maddening traffic, and ridiculous emergency wait times. It's also a cold corporate hell due to a majority of financial and investment firms, who only focus on money and work, not life. I f you live here all your life, you are one of them, and you don't know. Coming from Quebec, which is a lot more vibrant , Toronto looks and feels like hell. The variety of international food is the one thing I can boast about in this city. Dining is great in Toronto, if you have any money left over after the lack of jobs, housing prices, and property taxes. It's probably pointless if only wealthy or well to do readers are commenting here. A single mother with children knows she doesnt want to raise her kids in Toronto.

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  16. LANGLEY CITY AND TOWNSHIP

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  17. As long as you live in a place that gets lots of snow, cars rust quickly (and therefore require early replacement), houses are cheap (perhaps due to low demand?) and population growth is minimal – you'll take a win in several categories…

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  18. Ottawa – crappy weather, 6 months of winter, so much salt on the roads that your car turns white most of the winter, heavily crowed freeway, center of city shuts down at night, cant get a job if you don't speak french, and rude people on the streets – paradise!

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    • Wah! Wah! Quit cryin’ and make good use of the bike paths in summer, the skating in winter, and stop making up stuff about salt on the roads and lack of English- speaking jobs.

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    • funny how this website is called MONEY SENSE, and not SUNNY CITIES dot com. MONEY-wise it is better to live in Ottawa, than the other cities. But if you're not interesting in good jobs, low pollution, low crime and quality of life, then you can many other cities that are "better" than Ottawa.

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    • I concur, Ottawa is the most wonderful place in the world if you work for the government. Everything is overpriced for what you get and there is not much to choose from. Do not move there unless you are bilingual and fit into the government of Canada employment equity template or else you will only get work in the retail sector and that is even a stretch if you want to work Downtown.

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    • Bitter much? Move!

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  19. I've been leaving in London for 10 years and cannot imagine leaving somewhere else

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  20. Best Place to retire is…..Powell River, BC. We moved here form Ottawa 3 years ago & we are very happy we did. Everything in the world grows here: palm trees, hardy bananas & my neighbor has some sort of citrus tree up against his house. There are on average only 31 days/year where we get frost! Yes, 31days!! This area is called the Sunshine Coast for a reason.

    There's no pollution, little crime, a great hospital & housing at half the price of Toronto. Almost every house in town has a great ocean view. The downside is the town is isolated (you reach it by ferry but we love it). Forget about museums & skating on frozen canals…..we spend our time hiking in the forest & on the beaches, fishing, kayaking & sailing the Desolation Sound. Ottawa # 1, no way!

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  21. Ok, now the best kept secret in Canada, but just don`t tell. Wawa, Ontario and along the coast of Lake Superior is simply (for the outdoorsperson esp), a `paradise`. The best drinking water in Canada, wolves, bears and cougars at your door *at least where we live, scared? and a peaceful nature filled existence like no other. Extremely friendly people, neighbours who clean your driveway to surprise you, (and there is snow like i have never seen) fish fries at the legion on a regular basis, (fresh whitefish yesterday!) curling club, lovely golf club, no traffic, no crime, and yes, we have a Timmies too! Retiring and moving from St.Thomas/London may have been the best decision of my life. Oh, did i mention it is considered to be the `canoeing capital of the world`? That too. The prospector is on order! True story! And we love it.

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  22. Is it just me or are others growing tired of the "Best Places to Live" articles? Every year is too much for me. The series seem to elicit nothing but criticism from readers and, let's face, i't's probably useless information for the majority of readers who live where they do for their job and they're not likely to uproot themselves and their families because of some quantitative exercise.

    I've been a subscriber to MoneySense since the very beginning, and I give subscriptions to friends and families; but I want to learn something new in every issue. To that end I appreciated three of the five feature articles in the April issue so thanks for keeping things interesting…but maybe we could give the Best Place article a rest for a couple years.

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    • It's not just you. I'm tired too. I live in Kingston and I can't begin to tell you that aside from the Waterfront I have nothing towards this city but animosity. This city would rather see innocents in jail then possible criminals. Just like the u.s. I was born here. I pray I don't die here. O.K you can't go in to stores in this city unless it's walmart, or zellers, or toys r us without possibly accusations of shop lifting. Or other possibly theft activities. Tell me how accusing your fellow citizen of a crime, or possible crime makes a city look good? Yes I am speakiing from experience.

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      • I've shopped in Kingston, and never had this look or experience. Matters how you look, if you carry large bags, or if you huddle too close to merchandise. Shopkeepers don't factor in to the rating of a city. Actual crime, job rate, weather, etc… matter. Surely an immigrant in one of the top all white cities, is going to feel isolated , even if never accused of shoplifting. How you feel, doesn't form part of a measurable statistic.

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    • No , not growing tired at all, because mayors need to know what they're doing wrong. A city is a corporation, it matters that some cities do better than others, it means someone is doing their job. If anyone is thinking of moving, better to consult this list, than regret it later, life is not only about the where the job is, if you have to run from guns getting to your car. Living in Toronto, means sitting in traffic 2 hours each way and listening to who got shot, every night. Now that I'm ready to move, and my mom is going to retire, it matters like crazy. A lot of retirees want to know. I search these stats out regularly and i'm not a subscriber. Gets mayors to be competitive and wake up.

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  23. I've been in Burlington for approx 6 months. I moved from Toronto and I clearly see and feel the difference in quality of life. I have visited most of the places within GTA before, and I deeply understand why Burlington is considered one of the best place to live. Not only in Canada I can assure. Proud to live in this lovely city. Further, I will not be surprised seeing this city at the top #1.

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    • Hi Claudio,

      I am also considering burlington. Are there any good areas you can recommend.
      We are a young family with a 13 month son.

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  24. I just go though the blog. It's really awesome. Thank you for sharing.

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  25. The weather rating is obviously biased by those living in Southwestern Ontario as that's where the editors are. The weather is milder there than in other locations in Canada but in the winter the tradeoff for mild weather is shades of brown and gray and in the summer it's smog days. I'll take a cold bright prairie winter day over a dreary Ontario winter day anytime. I also appreciate being able to breathe the air outside in the summer. When choosing to move from southwestern Ontario, weather, traffic, and air quality weighed heavily.

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    • Aren't your winters white? is that better than brown and grey? i think of England and brown and grey, I've never experienced brown and grey in the GTA in the last 17 years, just white when it happens.

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    • There are many sunny winter days too, like it Kingston

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  26. I don't see how the ranking of crimes is different for "best places to live" versus "best places to retire"… both seem to have a weight of 5. Eg. Aurora for best place to live is #7 for crime; Aurora for best place to retire is #144 for crime. What is the methodology difference? Thanks.

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  27. Wow…..having been to every major city in Canada and most of the minor ones, I can tell you this much. As a self employed medical professional, I can make a tidy living wherever I choose to live.
    The fact that you overlooked the Southern Interior of BC makes me wonder what you were thinking. Kamloops, Kelowna, Vernon, Penticton are all great towns and I would live in any one of them. I would choose them over anywhere else in Canada and I have a lot of professional friends who agree with me.

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    • The fact that Winnipeg, the murder capital of Canada beats out Penticton and Kelowna and for that matter the whole Okanagan Valley on this list is absurd! I totally agree with you Rationalwest (except Kamloops lol), best place in Canada is definitely the Okanagan hands down.
      HOT DRY DESERT weather (+40) in summer, tons of sunshine (more than Hawaii), snow in winter but not too much, beautiful lakes, beautiful people, CLEAN, nothing like it…

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    • Sounds like you're a traveling nurse…a future goal of mine. What is nursing like in Canada? You said you could make a tidy living wherever you chose, does that mean wages are "compfortable"? And if you could your favorite spot for a more relaxed life, where would you go? Thanks and I appreciate your honesty.

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    • I'm looking at moving to Kelowna, Vernon or Penticton in the new year. I'm moving from a busy city in Alberta which will be a nice change. Which of the 3 cities would you recommend for young (25 yr old) female? I want somewhere safe, beautiful and of course somewhere with a little excitement.

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  28. Where is the best place to live..??? Need to get out of Newfoundland and don't want to go back to Edmonton… HELP!!

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    • Hey I moved from St. John's to Edmonton and I find the more I live here (4 years now) the more I like it…jobs are abundant and they're good jobs. Summer's are great, yes the winters are cold but that's when people should take vacations…think about it!

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  29. We went to wine country looking to learn the basics about great wine and the wine making process and found Wine Edventures through yelp

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  30. What about maing it more believing so we all can just believe it

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  31. I like this blog .Your blog is very interesting.
    Thank you!

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  32. I am happy when reading your site with updated information! thanks a lot and hope that you will post more site that are related to this site.

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  33. The factor of discretionary income puzzles me. Why is discretionary income ranked as a percentage of total income? Living in a lcoation that provides higher income, reduces the effect of this number. When spending dollars, you don't spend a percentage of your income, you spend real money. I think this ranking should be done based on discretionary income dollars, not percentage of total income.

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  34. This list is way off the mark. I have been through almost EVERY single city in Canada, and lived and worked in quite a few of them as well. Ottawa makes me sick to my stomach. For those of you tax paying middle income people that have spent any time there, I don't have to say any more. I lived in Burlington for 14 years. (Loved it) A very clean city with great parks and services too. I lived in Halifax for 8 years. Warm climate? ( Ha Ha) Too much rain and fog. It's also a port city, so it's not for everyone. Now let's get down to the west (Currently living in Calgary). Alberta has taken the title from Toronto as the new "big Lie" Similar to the 5 years I spent working in the oilfields up north.

    Big money, big jobs, big rent, big spenders, land of credit and home of the repo. Wait a few years til this province really takes a dive. Not a place I would invest. Not much for lakes either.

    BC. "Bring Cash" for wages that don't reflect the housing market. I spend a lot of time in BC and it has to be one of the most wasted provinces ever. The governments in BC have managed to financially screw up a place with some of the best natural resources in the world. BC has some beautiful places, but you will pay for it. Taxes aren't cheap either. Gas is always up there as well. (usually about 15 to 20 cents a litre more that AB.)

    Let me sum up this article the way it should be.

    Best place to live in Canada……..The one that works for you, because we are all different.

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  35. I can't believe edmonton ab is in the top ten list and Calgary is not! WOW, Calgary was a great place although very expensive, it was superb living.

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  36. hello all pls am a foreigner and am looking for a very good place to stay in Canada dat is very affordable….like good job opportunity, cheap housing, very less crime rate, very good weather and cheap univercities dere

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  37. This year, the downloadable excel data is protected, unlike 2011. Is it possible to find a place to download the editable (actually filterable) 2012 data for convenience? Or simply provides the password to unprotect the datasheet? Appreciate this awesome statistics.

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  38. This is a survey for mediocre people who can't afford or keep up with the pace of Canada's only three large cities. What kind of person would ever choose Regina, Red Deer, or Brandon over Toronto or Vancovuer? My guess is a boring Canadian with little-to-no creativtiy or edge- much like the stereotype that Canada deals wtih all the time.

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    • Wonder if you've been to more places than the 3 biggest cities…. If so you'd know a little more about it & the people that live in those " other places" so ignorant.

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  39. I hate Toronto and im only 21. I love going snowboarding, gold, skating and surfing. I don't really like the big cities, i prefer to get out to the country side every weekend while alot of my friends just like going out and shopping. If i wanna go out clubbing/shopping i head into the cities for a weekend every once and a while. It depends on what lifestyle you live. Good list

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  40. I'm moving to regina after Christmas. Is Regina a good place to live?

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  41. BC HAS EVERYTHING A PERSON COULD WANT! WHEN COMPARING PROVINCES FOR ALL OVER BEAUTY, RESOURSES, CULTURE, HISTORY, WEATHER, & I COULD CONTINUE TO LIST THEM, OURS IS #1 wE WELCOME YOU TO EXPLORE ONE OF THE GREATEST PLACES ON EARTH!

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  42. All the points listed above are important. How-ever, I for some reason( unknown) have a soft spot, in-fact a great fondness for university for university towns, or to put it differently, places with a distinct and if possible unique, educational, which is to quite an extent related to culture, in my opinion, heritage.

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    • yes absolutely, but which one is arthritis friendly?

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  43. alberta is the richest provence with the lowest taxes (unless your a farmer) and has the best edgucation and a mixture of mountains, plains, forest, and canadian shield

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    • Education is to learn how to spell. It does have mountains, forests etc but where is the water
      West ed mall

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    • This info is very good for me.This site is awesome. My spouse and i constantly come across a new challenge & diverse in this article.

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  44. Funny to see that everyone is partial to where they live! I think it depends on your priorities. Personally, I love the ocean, so I've always loved Halifax. That being said, I've visited the lakes region east of Montreal and that was just a wonderful little area as well. Who's to say what's good for each person. I say, if you're happy, stay there!

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  45. I am considering migrating to Australia or Canada. Still digging out whatever info as possible.

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  46. I've only been to Toronto and Calgary both of which I thought were great, but I've heard great things about Vancouver. Why is that not in the list?

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    • Because Vancouver is so expensive! Probably the most beautiful city on earth, let alone Canada. However, lots of high skilled workers and not enough jobs to go around means that employers pay little and demand more. Great outdoors and wonderfully laid back, but you have to earn a lot of money to get on here. Forget buying a decent house in Vancouver as well! One recent study showed that it is now the 2nd least affordable city on earth! High immigration from China may have contributed to this. Over 55% of Vancouver's population is non-Canadian.

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      • I saw Vancouver on a CNN documentary and it is indeed a beautiful city but then again indeed on of the most expensive in the world – if not even at par or above living in New York City!!

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    • I've only been to Toronto and Calgary both of which I thought were great, but I've heard great things about Vancouver. Why is that not in the list?

      A good point but I don't agree with that..

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  47. I am not really fond of big and crowded cities. Suburban area is where I want to live in.

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  48. I like a peaceful life besides my family.

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  49. I want to bay a propriety in Florida so I share my opinion to my friend he is a propriety broker than he suggest me to buy a propriety in Canada but there propriety rate is so high. Is that correct or not.

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    • Canada is suffering a massive bubble according to every bank and economist reviewing it right now

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  50. Vancouver BC has the 2nd highest housing costs in the >>WORLD<<, after Hong Kong. Also, Vancouver has monsterous property taxes courtesy of our Mayor and his Vision party. How can any body afford to live here? The city has become a city exclusively for 649 and LOTOMAX winners only.

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  51. I've heard some amazing things about Cananda. Haven't had a chance to visit but would love to take my wife someday.

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  52. This list is horribly skewed in favour of cultureless suburbs, I wouldn't trust it. A lot of these cities are in inhospitable climates and characterised by big box stores and suffer from significant brain drain as the young and talented emigrate. Outside of the couple of them, perhaps Ottawa, none of these offer environments where the 21st century knowledge economy can thrive, let alone take root.

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    • I laughed reading your comment because I live in Ottawa and i consider it part of your "culture-less suburbia in inhospitable climates and characterized by big box stores and suffer from significant brain drain as the young and talented emigrate"
      In fact, it is a very sad place to live. the only thing that makes it worse than other places is the fact that it has a majority of docile government workers, and if you are not bilingual you are less than dirt. Good luck finding a job if you can't speak eloquent french.

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  53. If Winnipeg is on a top ten list of cities, don't trust the list. Enough said.

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  54. how is life in prince george

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  55. Want o move to Halifax. But so many controversial comments on it……

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  56. How much are the life's expenses / Tax in Vancouver?

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  57. I have some family living in Ottawa and to be honest it sounds a much nicer placer to live than the UK is now. I'm sure I will have to visit soon just to check it out

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  58. Well Canada sounds a lot better than London right now thats for sure and also the currency is looking stronger

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  59. I spent a lot of time in Ottawa, got sick of the people there. Moved to BC after 5 years there and have never been happier. There's nothing wrong with the place, only pluses.

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  60. hello Everyone,
    I am a chef and would like to know places in Canada which has a good scope for my profession.
    Some of my friends say Edmonton,Alberta is a good place for my profession. Since i am migrating would like to know some more info .

    Reply

  61. Winnipeg made it #10 sweet!.. go Jets

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  62. i think regina is ok, depens on wut you liike?

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